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Drupal Comments
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Posted By: Pegaseau on May 6 2013 06:17 pm
I would not recommand Drupal because of one point : it relies heavilly on modules.
The issue with modules is that they are seldom maintained professionnally.
You work a few years with a module and suddenly it is no more maintained. This is absolutely dramatic when working with customers.
Posted By: TT on April 17 2013 05:17 pm
Am reading a lot of negative about Drupal. The details of some of these comments I find either misleading or outright lies. Not sure what the agenda is of some of these "designers", but, at best, their knowledge is superficial, at worst their making stuff up to promote their own CMS.
Posted By: Jason on January 29 2013 03:52 am
Compared to other cms's:
- Very hard to update core
- Very slow
- Not intuitive
- The main developers are unfriendly and sometimes rude to new users who ask for help
- Not easy to find out how to do programming - it's like some people want to keep it hidden
- Drupal major revs (eg 6.x to 7.x) are not compatible - Drupal core developers say this is because they do not want to be stuck with old code in new revs. BUT their new major revs such as 7.x are old looking, monolithic, slow.
- Really bad documentation - for example, you will find numerous posts on drupal.org about how to update minor revs (6.x to 6.y) - and many of these posts have different information and/or conflict with each other - which means there is no single accurate reference point on how to do something - and no-one at drupal.org seems to care
- Themes, well, they are complicated, and many are amateurish
- Views is a god send, an amazing piece of software, but the rest of Drupal negates this advantage
- drupal.org is in its own world, not oriented to users
Posted By: PeterM on January 5 2013 03:13 pm
I have compared Drupal many other CMS. I am not really impressed.
You find a lot of features in Drupal, but you will find the same in many other CMS.
I found the admin very annoying, the templating system quite bad.
I often have customer asking for Drupal. But it is easy for me to show them why another CMS will be easier. Not only because of the admin, but foremost because of the module managment of Drupal that becomes a headake for maintaining them.
Drupal has a different philosophy than most of other CMS : there are little features in core and you need to add modules to get a decent website (at least about 80 modules).
Other CMS have all these features already in core which make their maintenance very easy.
I do not recommand Drupal.
Posted By: Pierre on January 3 2013 09:43 pm
Drupal is an old timer. It was a good CMS years ago. Today, you should look at the new generation of CMS. To name a few : Ionize (excellent for multilingual sites), CMS made simple, Silver stripe, ModX.
Posted By: Kway on December 16 2012 10:20 pm
At first, Drupal looks like a nightmare. You have to add a lot of modules to get a functional website, theming is also a pain, but once you get to know Drupal, it is powerful and flexible. I really like it.
Posted By: Jason on November 29 2012 11:40 pm
Drupal is an ackward solution. While getting a Drupal site up-and-running may be trivial (if you want a simple personal blog) and anyone that tells you that you will be up-and-running, and developing totally customised sites within a couple of months, is just not being realistic.

If you are very dedicated, you can learn to setup and configure a functioning, full-featured Drupal site within that time period, for sure. That means, learning how to install and configure the core package, then learn about all the different modules out there, learn how to install and configure those, and learning how to install and configure templates (site design themes), too.

The problem is, although there are hundreds of modules available for Drupal, the vast majority has problems, ranging from design flaws, through bugs, to security risks, as pointed out below. Modules often conflict with one another, and with the core.
The issue as a newbie is that you don't know where to start, which module to pick-up, which one will work or fail.
You have to spend do much time in testing and testing.

The bigger problem is when you want to upgrade them. Say, Drupal has a new version, or the mosdule has a new version. You never know if the upgrade will fit with all other modules you have installed. This can kill a rpoduction site.

The Drupal community, in my experience, certainly has lots of helpful people, and people working very hard at trying to make the product better. Unfortunately, not everyone in the community is welcoming of newbies. The experience described by the poster below (complaining of unfriendliness) is a very, very common one, and I for one would certainly advise anyone from trying to get support help on Drupal irc or forums, not unless you've already read at least 'Pro Drupal Development', and put together a couple of sites.

Although I've now invested a lot of time in Drupal, ultimately I would strongly advise anyone new to the CMS scene to invest time and effort with the project. There are certainly better, and easier, tools available, with more supporting communities. I would suggest beginners look at alternatives such as the wonderful 'Website Baker', for very simple, static sites. Slightly more complex sites can be built with easier alternatives, such as Silverlight. For truly customised solutions, I would not hesitate to recommend MODx - its community is absolutely outstanding. Any of these solutions would give you a better, more polished final product - IMHO - would require less learning time, and would certainly give you a lot less stress.
Posted By: tmax on November 25 2012 08:07 am
high learning curve but is very flexible
Posted By: Royce on November 16 2012 10:27 pm
I am a developer and I am doing websites for clients. I have been using Drupal for over 5 years. I liked it. Because at that time it was one of the CMS showing extensibility, customization and SEO.
At that time I could choose between many CMS like typo3, Joomla, Spip, etc. I preferred Drupal.
Over the years I did not tried to look every second day for a other CMS. Drupal just covered my needs in a very decent way.

Very recently a friend of mine told me to look at Expression Engine. I was a bit reluctant, because of lack of time. But over a week-end, on month ago we had the possibility to take the time to look at it over a week-end.

I was impressed by the power of EE. Sure, a total other philosophy than Drupal. But man, I was bluffed. It is like in the automotive: every car is able to bring you from point A to point B. But hey, don't compare a Ferrari with a Chinese car.

As I was driving this Expression Engine CMS, I was amazed how smooth, how intelligent, how fast it was. A flexibility that I was just dreaming about. Every bit of pixel is under full control.
But more than that, a documentation that is second to none.
You are in the admin and you don't know what to do: you just click the help button; You are directly linked to the help, but on the exact point that explains you what to do about the point where you were stuck. Bluffed!

But more than that, much more. I thought Drupal had the best user permission feature. But in EE I saw the master. It goes much further than Drupal regarding user permissions.
Module, the big weakness of Drupal because of all these modules you have to instal, their maintenance and updates. In EE, 90% of what you need is in core. You don't need to add all this anoying modules that have the big drawback to stuck you server.
Everything is in core. You don't need to tweak and adjust. It is in core and it works.

Speed: EE is light fast compared to Drupal. But it has to be said that Drupal is slow because of the many modules you have to install. Think about that, you have to install about 80-100 modules in Drupal to get a decent site.
In comparison, EE you have to install nothing. It is in core!
So no upgrade, no issue to wait that module get upgraded when Drupal is updraded.
Everything works.

Category management is just superb. Drupal looks middle age with its feature.
Content type: here again, by far Ferrari has the lead.
Admin UI : if you just compare, than Drupal is stoneage. Just have a look, you'll see it ny yourself.

SEO: here again, the master gives you control about everything. EE is born SEO.

I stop here the list of amazing features. But I could write much more about it. I just fall in love of Expression Engine.
So much that I did the next website with it.
A breeze! And a lot of fun. This is exiting with EE: you have a lot of fun using it.
Where I spend 3 hours with Drupal, I spend only 1 with EE.

But high-end has a cost. EE is not free. It cost 300 USD.
But regarding the time I save, it is worth while buying this CMS. And on top you have the please to drive a powerfull machine.

At last, EE has another cost: you have to learn it. Install is straight forward. To use it, you need to follow their documentation, at least to understand how to use the CMS.
Posted By: Jopel on November 11 2012 01:04 pm
I tried Drupla 7.x on 4 hosting providers. On Dedicated servers. It is damm slow.
You have to add around 80-100 modules to have a normal working site. Usually to have 1 feature working (say image) you need to install 4-6 modules.
All these add-ons make the final site slow as hell on dedicated server. Don't ever use it on shared server.
Posted By: Colin on October 27 2012 10:00 pm
Drupal is a CMS of medium class. Not the worst, not the best. It has a very unfriendly administration, it is slow, and has very little feature in the core.

One can add numerous features through additional modules. But yes, modules are a big issue. For example you will need to install several modules if you want pictures on your site. Not one sole module, but several. Same for music, videos, multilingual, editor, etc.
At the end one can have over 100 modules to have a decent site.
Problem is that these modules are NEVER up to date when a new version of Drupal is released.

It is true also that the more you install modules the more Drupal becomes slow. Very slow. I have never seen that with other CMS (I did 22 sites using Joomla, Wordpress, Drupal, Expression Engine and ModX).
Drupal has a poor cache system and therefore speed become a critical aspect.

Regarding design, Drupal has no flexibility at all. Compare it to ModX or Silverstripe and you will see that you only loose a lot of time when you try to design Drupal.

But as said Drupal is not the worst CMS. It has strong SEO and blog features.
Basically I would say it is a blog CMS that tried to become a website CMS. But this includes all the drawbacks of such a move.
Posted By: Cain on October 25 2012 06:21 pm
Drupal is an old timer CMS.
Yes you can do (almost) whatever you want with it.
But it does not have the elegance, the flexibility and the speed of the new generation of CMS.

Modules are numerous but not well maintained. It has happened to us that after having installed various modules for one of our customer, we had to update the site. For a specific module, it was then impossible to have an update and we had to code the full module again. A real shame and a real waste of time.

What we do not understand with Drupal is why they put so many feature under modules (not in core). In many other CMS the same feature are in core (text editor, image, cache, tempalte, and may other ones).

On top od that Drupal has a very bad cache system that leads to very bad performance. Just install a few modules and you will see the site performance slow down like crazy.
Posted By: Waste of money and time on October 23 2012 02:55 pm
Drupal 7 is a horribly poor and buggy application, and a waste of time. Bug ridden, bad documentation, odd coding practices, slow as can be. Bug cues are filing up faster than people can answer them.

All this while Aquia rakes in millions, and paying the people who contribute nothing. The product is a slow application riddled with errors and bugs. Even people who work with it for years say it is difficult. Don’t be surprised if this open source project goes bust.

It is one of the worst, if not the worst applications I have ever seen. You don’t have to take my word for it. Do a search on some Drupal error messages. You’ll come across website after website that has them displayed right there on the website. Don’t count on a quick fix either, unless you are willing to pay megabucks. It’s almost like they do it on purpose. If you complain? Well, you got it for free didn’t you? Why don’t you contribute? Fix it yourself! If you get an answer at all.

One project to stay far far away from for untill it improves. This is one of those get it cheap applications, while mega time consuming, that ends up costing you money, and making a horrible web presentation. If you get a website launched (after weeks of delay) at all with it, changes are within no time you'll have errors to deal with. It needs a lot of server horsepower to get in the air which for what it does is absolutely ridiculous. Oh, they tell you it has a learning curve, and once you getr the Drupal way. The best thing to get is that this is a failing and poorly executed project, and to go somewhere else.

There are plenty of other options which are easier, cheaper, simpler, better documented, less maintenance, better service, and way less bugs. Drupal 7 is going the OpenSuse route, used to be promising now it is just a code mess for someone that wants to tinker. You’d be quicker writing your own application, or using one of the excellent other options out there.
Posted By: Michael on October 22 2012 10:32 pm
Drupal is like Joomla. Both CMS had their glory time. Both CMS were at high level a few years ago.

I know them both quite well for having used them several years. But I do not use them anymore, or only if a customer insists to have them (but this happens very seldom).

I do not use them anymore because today you find much better CMS: Modx, Silverstripe, Expression Engine to name just a few.
This new generation of CMS have little to compare with the 'old CMS': Drupal, Joomla, e107, etc.
Their whole philosophy is different.

Here are a few examples:
- Performance: Drupal and Joomla are both slow. Drupal becomes very slow once you have added a bunch of midules.
- Easy and flexible template system (you build whatever you want) with easy and full support of web standards (XHTML, CSS and Javascript). Forget Drupal and Joomla here. You will waste a lot of time and never be satisfied with the results.
- Well tested and bug-free (not like Drupal that has always security issues. Joomla is much better here.)
- Well documented: Drupal has a lot of information, but is it rather incomplete and not structured. Often it is outdated.
- Ressource (or asset) management. Drupal has never be able to have one. That means you can not manage the site pictures, or any other files properly.
Almost unbelievable, but Drupal has no file management.
This is due to the fact that ALL ressources (pictures, any files) are owned by a 'node' and not by the user. It will be a hard work for Drupal to change that, and I don't believe they ever will be able to do such a change.

The big issue with Drupal is once you have installed it you have a skeleton, this means for instance:
- no pictures!!!
- no editors
- a poor administration
- no spam protection
- no SEO
- no query
- no possibity to add no fields in pages
- no pingback / trackback
- no XML sitemaps
- no file browsing
- No communication (sending e-mails, messaging, etc.)
- etc.

In Drupal you can have most of these features in adding modules.
This is a big issue very well analysed by Jean: you would need to add and activate around 80 modules to have a decent website.
Modules are rarely up-to-date and if core has moved to a new version, you are always in conflict between 'old version' modules and 'new version' modules.

Worse, module developement is community driven. Very often, the module owner stops his developement after a few years of work and leave the community without follow up. This is a big issue when you have site in production. It ends often in paying huge amount to get customized developement.

The next issue due to modules is site speed: the more you add modules in Drupal, the slower it becomes. If you build a Drupal site with decent features, site speed will be a big issue.
You can use all caching option, add cache modules, etc. Speed will always be an issue.
I use only dedicated servers. That means Drupal speed problem is not due to hardware. Really, I would not like to have Drupal installed on a shared server.

The new generation of CMS have most of above mentionned features (and much more) in core. This mean by each new release, all these feature are up-to-date: you avoid the Drupal nightmare.

Thanks to their excellent caching system, speed with the new generation of CMS is just not an issue at all.
They are lightweight, literally flying. Highly flexible, performant, of course fully featured.
Posted By: John on October 19 2012 10:14 pm
Drupal is just a bloated piece of code.
I prefer Modx. Elegant, superb, fast and amazingly flexible.
Posted By: a7 on October 5 2012 02:05 pm
If you search a system in between the flexibility of coding from ground up and "click > online" Drupal is the right choice. If your just looking for a system to build simple stuff, use Wordpress or Joomla.

Just built a prototype w Drupal in 5 hours with ~20 LOC for theming that would have taken me 5+ weeks in coding from ground up in Java and wouldn't have been possible without coding in neither wp or Joomla.
Posted By: RONY on September 7 2012 07:52 pm
Sorry Wordpress lovers, sorry to say but Drupal just simple rocks. True wordpress sometimes works faster. (Some times) But most of the time becomes pain.
Drupal is just rocking. Absolute Nice navigation. Complete freedom. Nice. VEry nice Very rocking. Simply Rocking.
Posted By: Gaelan on August 24 2012 12:58 am
I don't see what anyone has against Drupal. It is KILLER.
Posted By: wooke on August 15 2012 10:51 am
It's good if you have very basic skills and want to use one of the default themes, making your own design is way too difficult. I've been working with it for about 2 weeks, I think I'm gonna give up and just code everything byWedding Dresses 2012 hand.
Posted By: Drupaler on June 29 2012 12:51 am
To everyone in the comments who is hating on Drupal: you're right, Drupal sucks, keep developing in Wordpress or Joomla, and leave the Drupal projects to us... There is so much demand for Drupal from high dollar clients right now... it's just insane. So if you come across a client who requires that their site is build in Drupal, don't even bother, just send them my way please...
Posted By: BC on June 21 2012 07:28 pm
It's easy to update and theme, extremely powerful. I've built close to 100 sites on it and won't use anything else. Use the Zen theme as a staring point.
Posted By: Ray on June 19 2012 09:36 pm
It's good if you have very basic skills and want to use one of the default themes, making your own design is way too difficult. I've been working with it for about 2 weeks, I think I'm gonna give up and just code everything by hand.
Posted By: This is a cool demo on June 19 2012 09:06 pm
I really like the demo site, but the theme is a bit boring.
Posted By: jl on April 20 2012 03:20 pm
THE issue for me in using Drupal is that it is god awful to update - it is a multistep process that takes a long time. For this reason alone I shy away from Drupal.
Posted By: user who on March 28 2012 02:25 pm
Drupal is not for contributor developers. New modules, forks and their developers are hunted down with no mercy.
If you want to become a contributor developer, please think twice.
One reason is that the core architecture is a fast changing one. Updating your modules to fit the Drupal changes is a nightmare. Today you are satisfied with your knowledge on Drupal, and tomorrow you will feel a dumb.
Second reason? You won't be able to fix existing and unmaintained modules and you are not allowed to fork them (against GPL but Drupal policy). Exactly: you are, but you have to keep for yourself.
Last reason: See the demo here. Somehow Drupal took a direction leading to the obscurity. This is unfortunate ... but expected.
Posted By: GT on March 22 2012 03:14 pm
Totally agree what Mark said on Feb 20 2012, 7:09 am. Drupal is for developers, Drupal is best for developers.
Posted By: Robert on February 20 2012 11:14 pm
It looks like you have Drupal fans and Wordpress fans.
I belong to the second ones. Actually I started to develop many sites with Drupal, but then preferred Wordpress. It is simply awesome.

For instance flexibility: there is no better CMS regarding flexibility.
But what made me change was performance. I find Drupal's performances not good enough on larger projects.
Posted By: Sarah on February 20 2012 07:51 pm
I hate Drupal 7 because its really hard to develop on (good) shared hosts- I keep running into memory errors with a 64M limit. This should not happen! Back to drupal 6.
Posted By: Mark on February 20 2012 07:09 am
Drupal, Is by far the best CMS ever. I am a PHP developer and developing additional functionality to drupal is better than any other platform. At first I found it complex and hard to understand but as a developer once you learn the important things, CCK, theming, hooks, and module development basics, it makes other platforms seem stupid.
There are alot of modules that need to be installed to make it manageable, I have an installation that is cloned for new developments with at least 20 modules preinstalled that I cant live without. Wordpress is great for simple sites, and it still has drupal beat in administration. Alot of my development goes towards making administration better. Wordpress is a good choice if it fits your needs. But if you want flexibility drupal is king. Not sure why joomla exists because it is not as flexible as drupal or as easy as wordpress.
Posted By: lechugas on February 3 2012 06:41 pm
Wordpress has all the features Drupal has, and much more. Wordpress has over 12 000 plugins. There is no way that Drupal will come close to that.
In the past Drupal could claim it has CCK and views modules. But these nice modules are now also available for Wordpress.
Posted By: Henry on January 31 2012 05:55 pm
Wordpress has become a real killer.
No wonder why it was awarded best CMS over Drupal and Joomla.

Wordpress has all the features Drupal has, and much more. Wordpress has over 12 000 plugins. There is no way that Drupal will come close to that.
In the past Drupal could claim it has CCK and views modules. But these nice modules are now also available for Wordpress.

I don’t say that Drupal is bad. You can do good stuff with it. But why work with a CMS when you can find a much better one and much easier to use?
I had to build several website with Drupal (also Drupal 7.x) because of customers’ requirements. But everytime I can, I push another CMS (Wordpress very often).

This said, Drupal has several flaws.
- Drupal is very poor on many important features that are common with Wordpress. To name just a few: forum, picture gallery, social site.
- Next, the more you install modules on Drupal, the worse are the performances of your site. Compare Drupal with any other CMS with equal features, and you’ll see the difference in performance.
So if you plan to use Drupal on a shared hosting, just forget it.
Drupal is certainly the worst CMS regarding performances.
- Next, Drupal admin is crap. But I think many others have already written about that. So I won’t extend the issue. But it is always a nightmare to train customer on that one.
- Last, Drupal is unfriendly to use. Not intuitive and desperately confused.

So what’s the reason to use Drupal (or Joomla) when you have Wordpress that solve (almost) all your needs in a much better way? And that is a breeze to use.
Posted By: Lowell Montgomery on January 24 2012 08:40 am
Drupal is awesome, with a dynamic and fun-loving community of developers and themers behind it. If you are building a complex site and have the time to get over the learning curve, it's hard to go wrong with Drupal. OTOH, if you already have a Drupal 6 site, as Cassady said, migrating to Drupal 7 may be more trouble than it's worth. For the same effort (assuming you are even successful with getting your desired features all working), you could probably make significant improvements to a Drupal 6 site that might be more worthwhile than the migration to Drupal 7. I would only suggest upgrading a Drupal 6 site to Drupal 7 if you really need some features which are impossible to add with Drupal 6 (but even mobile support and a lot of things that might be easier to implement on a fresh Drupal 7 site are still possible with Drupal 6). Of course it depends on the complexity of your site and when you attempt to upgrade, but my assessment, at this time (and at least for the site I was working on) is that the upgrade path for many contributed modules is a bumpy road better left untraveled…
Posted By: Jovelyn on January 5 2012 11:58 pm
i need this version of Drupal...
Posted By: Cassady on October 3 2011 06:50 am
I upgraded to Drupal 7, and after upgrading all of the modules that were upgradable, I had SQL errors with my views. Given that a few of the modules my site uses are not available for Drupal 7 (several of them dev or beta) as well as the prospect of having to re-do all my views, I'm going back to Drupal 6.19. I didn't like the look and feel of Drupal 7, and it was extremely slow. To me, Drupal is going backwards. After reading the reviews of Drupal 7 and my experimentation, I will not try to migrate to version 7 until version 6 is no longer supported. And there's a good chance that I'll end up converting it to something else. The reputation of Drupal is that of a has-been. Only the Drupal fanatics will argue that point. Drupal has become a bloated mess. Drupal is most likely to be left in the dust by another up-and-coming CMS.
Posted By: Niels on September 30 2011 03:42 am
Please do not believe all te negative stuff in the other comments, i work for 3 years now with drupal and build many sites/portals i can say it is the BEST effer.
Posted By: Kirk on September 24 2011 08:27 am
To the person who mentioned Adaptivetheme:

http://drupal.org/project/adaptivetheme

Adaptivetheme is now a MOBILE theme based on responsive design. That's another plus for Drupal as mobile sites are a hot trend.

The Web has gone mobile crazy. Drupal is well-equipped for mobility thanks to its many mobile themes.
Posted By: Gert on August 25 2011 05:09 pm
Very disapointing...
I wanted to build a social website for our community using Drupal. Forget it.
Elgg is 1000 time more powerful, and free of course.


Posted By: Stu Ducklow on August 24 2011 02:00 pm
I spent six months trying to learn Drupal with the help of three books and tutorials from Linda.com

I can't honestly understand why anyone would use it. It's slow, extremely difficult to learn and demands such a high level of PHP expertise that you might as well code your own CMS.
Posted By: wicasso on July 31 2011 07:25 am
Drupal works best for me for many reasons :

1) It has an excellent, flexible theming and templating system. I can take my existing HTML/CSS design and port it easily to a Drupal theme with NO change. Instead of creating a theme from scratch or changing other themes, Drupal has many base/starter themes that allow designers to create, customize, adapt, port a theme without coding. My favorite base/starter theme is AdaptiveTheme,

http://drupal.org/project/adaptivetheme

2) Drupal has a huge, friendly community actively developing more than 10,000 modules and 1,000 themes for all types of sites.

3) Flexibility: Create my own CONTENT TYPE and create my own fields for the content type. Flexible theming system. Flexible API for creating own functionalities and integrating with other applications.

4) Commitment and active support for open Web standards, W3C standard compliance, accessibility, usability, etc...

5) Multilanguage and internationalization: I develop site for clients who want international languages along with English. Multilingual site is easy in Drupal. Multilanguage is built-in.

These are just a few reasons why I like Drupal.
Posted By: Watch Free Drupal Tutorial Videos on July 14 2011 01:57 am
Drupal is a publishing platform created by our vibrant community and bursting with potential. Use as-is or snap in any of thousands of free designs and plug-ins for rapid site assembly. Developers love our well-documented APIs. Designers love our flexibility. Site administrators love our limitless scalability.
Posted By: drupal user on June 30 2011 04:41 pm
Seriously this is the most bloated, confusing piece of dog crap you can get. Docs are definately not good enough and many modules dont have docs or good examples for version 7. The interface for each module is crazy. I'm racking my brain against the wall with this over used turd.
Posted By: Morten on June 5 2011 12:30 pm
Best CMS I ever used
:-)
Posted By: Shannon on May 13 2011 11:35 am
Unlike a lot of people commenting who likely just install the CMS, a theme and call it a day, I have worked extensively with the primary PHP-based CMS's inside and out - in this case, Drupal and WordPress.

In the Drupal vs WordPress comparison, both of them accomplish very different things. WordPress has been gaining traction very fast as a CMS especially with WordPress 3, and the fact that you can now create content types (although it's not obvious how to do so off the bat) gives WordPress a stronger argument. For sites where the client simply wants to edit pages, content and maybe a blog or news, WordPress will cover this better, IMO.

But Drupal does allow for greater fine tuning of the CMS such as permissions and theming. As friendly as WordPress may appear to be, the backend can still be overwhelming with unnecessary options to clients, so Drupal's structure makes it much better for whittling the admin theme and permissions down to what you want it to be. Drupal is also stronger at creating community driven sites right out of the box, versus WordPress (even with addons like BuddyPress). It is also a better choice for enterprise or intranet, having worked with some clients with those needs.

However, everything is not rosy in Drupal land at all...it is versatile but has a steep development learning curve and high development time / cost. Theming can be painful at times as some things in Drupal that isn't handled by the theme require overriding with custom modules / hooks, which quickly becomes a genuine pain in the rear.

Drupal 7 has come a long ways in improving the backend interface, but there is so much more that they need to do. The initial Drupal 7 release - as well as many contrib modules - is functional but can be kind of buggy. Unfortunately it has been four months since Drupal 7 was released and we haven't seen so much as a .01 update yet, and it sort of concerns me that judging by Twitter comments, Dries and other Drupal people at least appear to be more focused on Drupal 8 right now.

As for myself, I have since moved on from Drupal and even WordPress to Ruby on Rails. While that is NOT a CMS but rather a programming framework, on a major project I was able to build my own CMS the way *I* needed it, and in much less time than trying to override, strip out or fight what CMS's like WordPress or Drupal already assume I want to do.

In the end though, Drupal has it's place as WordPress isn't the best option for everything. It's used by a lot of major companies and businesses for a reason. But it's arguable that you may want to stick with Drupal 6 right now until D7 matures.
Posted By: Bono on May 10 2011 04:49 am
RE: GoldPath on April 10 2011 01:34 pm

"... For a personal site go ahead with Drupal. For a professionnal: choose another one. "
You obviously have no background to make such a statement.

Some links for you to start out:
- http://www.drupalsites.net/
- http://buytaert.net/tag/drupal-sites
- http://drupal.org/success-stories
- http://drupal.org/forum/25
Posted By: Bono on May 10 2011 04:12 am
Many of these comments are soooooo familiar from the linux-windows debate. "oh mama! Linux ain't Windows, so therefore linux sucks right?".

Hey you know what kids...
WordPress and Drupal ain't competitors and they will never aim at being identical or similiar (still they can learn from eachother, and openly do), they aim at two very different markets. I.E. Drupal does not try to be a plug-and-play solution but the architectures best friend, where WP tries to be a set-and-go blogplatform. If you were expecting Drupal to BE Wordpress then im sorry, you have been terribly misled. It will never happen, so please stop your childish crying and go and enjoy what you was really were looking for - WordPress.
Posted By: Jayson on April 28 2011 07:30 pm
WordPress is much better than Drupal 7 on many levels - user interface, development, customization, updating, etc.

Wait! To all those Drupal fans - I know what you are going to say - Drupal is much more than WP ever could be - Drupal has CCK and Views and WP don't - well that is no longer true - do a Google on Wordpress CCK and you will be very surprised.

There are at least 3 projects that allow WP to create custom content....

Posted By: Ratar on April 11 2011 08:00 am
If you need to create a huge, complex website for a corporation and you're a nerd that studied IT, this CMS might be useful.

If you need to do a standard website, take any CMS over this illogic, bloated thing.
Posted By: GoldPath on April 10 2011 01:34 pm
Not convinced by Drupal at all. First I get the same functionlities with quite a few other CMS. Second, for a professional Drupal is a no go.

Nevertheless I found it simple to install (I tried Drupal 6.x and 7.x) and not difficult to use. I do not understand why people mention a steep learning curve: Drupal is easy to use.

What I did not like in Drupal is the lack of flexibility for design. OK you have modules and all that stuff to help. But nothing at the level of CMS like Typo3, Silverstripe, ModX, CMS made simple, and a few others.

The other negative point is what Julia mentionned: the modules. A lot of modules but a big lack of consistency with the core, anarchical development that lead to security and maintenance issues.
Good CMS have their main features in core, not in modules, because this allow them to ensure the overall code quality.

But this said, Drupal is certainly not a bad CMS. Please do not exagerate. I recommand it for beginners, people that want to build their own site.
For people working with customer I would not recommand it due to the issue on modules.
There si a function to "automatically" upgrade modules on Drupal. But Drupal as a new release (due maily to security issues) every 2 months.
Would you have 100 customers with Drupal installed on several servers, forget the upgrade: it is a nightmare.

And as the modules do not follow the same release rythm than the core, you can get stuck quite fast.

For a personal site go ahead with Drupal. For a professionnal: choose another one.
Posted By: gt on April 1 2011 06:26 pm
Drupal is the dream of php developers. Its not just a cms. You get a very well structured and documented framework. Very extendable due to it's complete hook system and centralized node/field logic. It's not joomla. Drupal made for skilled users. If you aren't, go for other CMS instead complaining. You will wonder how many successful sites using it.
Posted By: pb on March 19 2011 02:10 am
Drupal 7 is significantly better than previous versions and works wonderfully. Also changed for the better structure of the database. I find for myself Drupal 7 is better cms in the present.
Posted By: Martin on February 26 2011 04:25 am
I've used Drupal for a couple of years now and find it fantastic. You need to install a few extra modules in order to benefit from it fully, such as:

CK Editor (gives you a Word like interface).
Backup and Migrate (creates safe backups)
IMCE or Image Assist (for images)

Overall it's a brilliant CMS. It's also ideally suited to more complex sites like discussion forums, or ones where different users need different permissions.
Posted By: Mike on February 3 2011 01:30 pm
Notepad works probably faster when making a simple personal homepage. But for making big/nice/complicated webapplications there is no (free) alternative. Drupal is hard to learn, but when you have discovered all the possibilities (cck and views are the minimum required modules for that) it gets very addictive.

Question,

Any other cms' with features like cck and views? I honestly haven't tried that many other cms'.
Posted By: Joel on February 2 2011 03:35 pm
Drupal is disappointing.
It is heavy, bloated. Yes full of stuff, full of everything. But at the end, provided you have a lot of time to loose, this means full of nothing.

Drupal 7 should have been the best of the best of Drupal. It is a piece of crap. Others might look at it in another way.
But really, such a heavy administration, lack of logic, unfriendly: this is the end of CMS.

Furthermore Drupal 7 has the same drawbacks than its predecessors: slow, very slow, even on dedicated.

OK, the first install works fine. But when you install modules, you literally see the CMS diying.
Try any other CMS, their speed and performance are light speed compared to Drupal.

Drupal has the speed of an elephant. This is actually what Drupal is: big, heavy, bloated.

This said, you must know that you still can find worse than Drupal.
Posted By: Martin on January 26 2011 03:42 pm
I am very happy about Drupal 6. Just used it for 3 Projects and it simply worked.
Drupal, I think, is the best working Open Source Project of all CMS! All modules are maintained and if you get an error, you will get a solution within the next 3 hours.

Drupal 7:
- existing logical errors fixed
- faster, admin menu organized

@the guy below me:
1. To use the same Admin Menu as in the module in d6, just install the module ;)
2. All the guys who are maintaining all the modules have to wait for the release before programming new modules (or fixing them)!
3. For updates you can install "plugin_manager", but it is as save as the one in wordpress ;)
4. The thing is: in drupal you can change the Admin-interface - in wordpress you can´t

So in my opinion drupal is hard to learn, but if you got it you can make projects faster and more efficient than with wordpress, joomla, etc.

Anyone mentioned the huge plugin database of wordpress. I think 1/3 of all Plugins work in the newest version.
Posted By: Drupal 7 is very disappointing on January 15 2011 06:55 pm
VERY disappointed!

The new interface is hard to use - unlike the Admin menu of D6 which has dropdown menus to allow you to see submenus and hence allows you to get to sections quickly, D7 does not have this.

Many modules are NOT compatible with D7 - For example, ALL modules I would use to place a Contact author link on a node are NOT avail for D7 - meaning I cannot use D7 for many of my sites

THE problem with Drupal 6 is its update process. While for example Wordpress updates in a press of a button, Drupal 6 requires a long and tedious process to update it.

Do you think they addressed this in Drupal 7? NO. Not at all. VERY disappointed!

As a user, it seems D7 is nothing but D6 with CCK thrown in, is not a rewrite and simply has a different and IMHO not improved user interface.
Posted By: Drupal is just hype and over-acclaimed on January 14 2011 09:40 pm
In my opinion Drupal is just hype and over-acclaimed. It may be a good CMS if you are a large organization with lots of financial resources or have many experienced web developers and webmasters.


Over complicated
Performance problems
Expensive to maintain
Difficult and expensive to customize and setup
Over complicated
Backward compatibility problems
Scalability issues
Usability problems
Long learning curve and overwhealming for entry level webmasters


This article says it all:
Drupal vs Joomla
Posted By: justme on January 14 2011 02:39 pm
I have drupal. Just loaded it. their community forum is not very good. If you need an answer, read the document. Hard to search their forum for answers. I am thinking it could be a good program, but expect to read and not ask for help. Searching google is your best bet for the answer!
Posted By: arnold on December 17 2010 04:46 pm
Absolutely the best you can just create your own site with this in only mintues
Posted By: User on December 8 2010 03:01 am
I think a lot of the negative votes come from that Drupal is not Joomla.
With that I mean a brick that is ready to throw through the window. I also woulnd't really call Drupal a CMS, rather a framework. It does NOT come in a fire and forget mode right out of the box, you have to tinker with it - which gives Drupal unpresedented flexibility, but also comes with a steep learning curve. (and most of the users here give a max rating of 3 if they don't have a site in a working state within 30 minutes it seems.)
Posted By: Dan AA on December 4 2010 02:07 pm
I can't believe what I see here, so many people claiming that Drupal sites look less approaching, or that there are not enough templates, etc. I ask myself, does any of this "reviewers" build more than a single personal site? .
In real life, a graphic designer provides a design, the client approves it, and the web site has to respect the design to the last pixel. In general we start a Drupal template from scratch, so who cares about available templates, what is this concept of Drupal sites look this way or the other, a site has to respect the design regardless of the CMS behind it, Drupal , as many other CMS provides all the necessary tools to achieve that, if you can't achieve that then better hire someone skilled enough to do that. Claiming that on CMS site looks this way or the other is a scream to the world saying "I am not a developer !!". The discussion should be on performance, accessibility for the end user etc, but sure not about how a site looks like. A website is data, pure data, and a CMS is the tool to organize , edit and present that data to the world, the "look" is the least relevant factor, since it must be achieved in any case or with any CMS, so I choose Drupal, since I feel comfortable with the way it manages and pulls out the data with CCK, VIEWS, etc. To be honest, I used to work with Joomla quite a lot, the K2 component really fixed many of Joomla's main flaws, like ACL, section-category restriction, lack of flexibility for multiple templates overrides, custom fields, etc, but at a certain point, we had to touch the core to achieve what we wanted, I had too many conflicts between modules, plugins, libraries etc, so that was the point when we pulled out from it and carried on only with Drupal, and up to now, it does what we need.
Posted By: Jane on November 28 2010 01:00 pm
I am a big Drupal fan and I've been was very surprised about the award results giving Wordpress as best CMS in front of Drupal: http://www.packtpub.com/open-source-awards-home.
For sure Drupal was not far away from the first place (so i am not wrong of being a fan of it). But still, looks like the world is changing...

So I played a but around with Wordpress.
I've always been sceptical about it as it has been a blog platform. But Wordpress has changed a lot and believe me, one can now build excellent website with it.

Wordpress has over 12000 modules which is more than Drupal and Joomla together!

So next website will be built with Wordpress and I will be able to give a better feedback about the differences between both.

I can already say (but this is known by all drupalist) that the Wordpress admin interface is much better.
Performance seem also above what Drupal can deliver.

But I still want to see all my usual features before giving a definitive statement.
Posted By: Don't like reinventing the wheel on November 17 2010 10:16 am
Drupal seems to be a good stable CMS. Unfortunately, I am not a big fan of Drupal.Clients don't like the backend interface and I don't like reinventing the wheel.
Posted By: Adaptivetheme on October 29 2010 08:21 pm
Theming in Drupal is easy. You can create a theme from scratch in no time. If you have already a site, porting your HTML/CSS look and feel is even easier.
For those who want to create their own professional theme, Drupal has a unique concept called "base" or "starter" theme that allows you to cut significantly development time in creating your subtheme.

One favorite base theme is Adaptivetheme, http://drupal.org/project/adaptivetheme, because it is focussed on accessibility and standards. Adaptivetheme for Drupal 7 is now HTML5! Adaptivetheme has many cool subthemes developed for it, one of them is the Mobile theme.

I find it easy to develop from â??scratchâ? with Adaptivetheme. It is easy to port your existing HTML / CSS to Adaptivetheme. If you have already a site, it is easy to map your design, HTML and CSS to Adaptivetheme, and port it with little change.
Posted By: dotpex on October 25 2010 04:21 pm
@Michael: Looks like you newer learn drupal, or you are a themer with very little knowledge of drupal, theme layer, api, fapi or hooks...
When you learn drupal, you newer turn to joomla or other cms because you then know the drupal is superior.
Vary bad for several years of using, if you really use it.
Posted By: Babi?ko on October 4 2010 03:57 am
Wonderful CMS this CMS :) Drupal is very strongly working and very secured CMS Script. Thanks you very much for this programming! I am using in my web site.
Posted By: Jean on October 3 2010 01:52 pm
@JohnW, if you look to something at the level of ModX try Expression Engine (EE).
This is by far the best CMS I have ever used. And I've tried many.
Support is excellent, documentation is firstrate.
OK, some will point that EE is open source but you have to pay for it.
Personnally I do not mind to pay for it takes away days of headake, hacking and re-coding you will hav with the other CMS.
For those who want free CMS, ModX is certainly the best one, but with poor documentation.

OK, this is a Drupal section so I will leave a note for that CMS.
It is not bad. What is annoying is that you have to install so many modules before having some decent features.
Drupal 7 will be a bit different in that some modules will be part of the core.
I gave it a try (alpha version). On the core side it is much better than Drupal 6.x.
But I was shocked to see how slow it is.
I hope these guys will improve that.

But I would not compare ModX or EE to Drupal: these are completely other stuff. And I like them.
Posted By: Cory on October 1 2010 03:15 pm
@John, I used Joomla and I used drupal. I don't like both of them. But if you think Joomla is bedroom class, then you can put Drupal in the same bedroom.

These 2 CMS are heavy, very heavy and slow. Both of them.
I installed 4 CMS on same server : Drupal, Joomla, Contao and ModX.
I added modules so that all 4 CMS very equally featured with features like blog, picture gallery, forum, editor, audio.
Drupal and Joomla were the big looser.

You can do and re-do the test as often you want : these 2 elephants will never make it.

Personnally I find them old.
But I know, some people like them.
Posted By: JohnW on October 1 2010 12:44 pm
Ugh, I looked at typo3, it is complicated...and I've been programming 22 years, the last 12 LAMP.

Not to mention having to learn a proprietary scripting language in typo3?

Drupal seems to be straight forward. And the most important thing, once I develop a site for a client, the end-user should have no trouble adding content. The only downside, and I've seen this in nearly every canned CMS, is that when creating new articles, image/rich media management seems to be lacking, or non-existant.

Creating wordpress templates looks messy, joomla too.

I think at this point I'm jumping into Drupal for a personal project, and if I like it use it on future client sites.

I'm really tired of building custom back-end cms systems for different sites. If this doesn't pan out, then I may just switch to a php framework and use ModX (modx btw looks really cool, but the documentation is seriously lacking).
Posted By: John on September 23 2010 04:50 pm
Some of you might be quite surprised. Drupal is Industry standard when it comes to CMS. Joomla is bedroom standard. If you spend the time to learn it you'll only do good to yourselfs :)
Posted By: Phil on September 23 2010 01:58 pm
Drupal is an oldtimer. Not bad, fully featured. But you find better stuff around. Faster, better flexibility with all needed features.

I don't know what is meant with new generation of CMS, but go for Contao (excellent), apprain, silverstripe, etc.
Posted By: Marco on September 21 2010 03:43 am
Drupal is like Joomla or phpnuke a old things, you could do everything you would with lot off programming with PHP, but still a old framework.

I like better Typo3 , this going forward with technology and give you the essential time to dev your own application , without lost lot off time time and money to create the design and integrate it.

For me Drupal is just the second generation from phpnuke , more open but still builded with old technology...

Posted By: Chameleon on September 17 2010 05:29 pm
We think Drupal works ok for beginners. The sites look very amaturish unless you put many many hours in. We prefer Joomla for a more professional looking site.
Posted By: Spyros on September 16 2010 10:57 am
Michael, what are you talking about? "The new generation of CMS have most of above mentionned features (and much more) in core. This mean by each new release, all these feature are up-to-date: you avoid the Drupal nightmare."

First, I don't want new generation CMS to take decisions for what I use! I want to use whichever image gallery, WYSIWYG and SEO functionality I like. If new generation CMS means you're stuck with modules you might not like then obviously, they're not for the ones who like to customise everything.

Lastly, Drupal also puts good modules in core with every subsequent version. Just an example: Drupal 7 has CCK (fields) and Views in core.
Posted By: Jerry on September 16 2010 06:36 am
Drupal is by far the best CMS/Framework.
Posted By: Denis on September 4 2010 01:40 pm
A CMS like MODx and Drupal are incomparable. Drupal is so much more than a CMS. It is a Content Management Framework. You will never be able to do the same thinks with MODx that you can do with Drupal. Drupal is oversized for the most small and simple sites. For more complex sites with functionalities beyond the basics drupal is irreplaceable.
Posted By: mindcare on September 4 2010 07:47 am
Wow! Michael's comments makes me tired to learn how to use Drupal. I did not have enough time to waste and after i will regret of using it. They also wrote about New generation CMS, now i would like to know the best.

I know that Drupal Admin are taking note from members of this site. I suggest them to not to be angry with them members, because this is the only way to correct the mistakes, and without suggestions, complain, they'll not know how good or bad their sites looks like.

I'm Mindcare and please DO NOT fire me, because i still wanna try Drupal to see things with my two naked eyes....
Posted By: Jane on September 1 2010 02:51 pm
Compare it to Joomla. Some features are better other are worse.
Good for blogging, editing it has a lot of modules. But bad performance (cache), no design flexibility, no ressource management.
Posted By: Suborna Fermi on August 23 2010 07:41 am
Drupal is a very powerful secured CMS . All kinds of cross site scripting is handled carefully in drupal. We can use drupal for large amount of contents. In drupal lots of free modules are available like ubercart, event, blog, caching, security , multilingual features. Now lots of large scale site is also developed on Drupal like white house official website, Fedex site etc. So you can use Drupal without any hesitation.
Posted By: Mr Australia on August 21 2010 11:50 am
Drupal 7 is the best, just love it. Better than any other CMS that I have ever tried. Very configurable, the new default theme is excellent. A 5 star vote for Drupal!
Posted By: xxxhjhgD2 on August 20 2010 02:02 am
I've had two wow stages with Drupal over the last eight months.

1) Discovering just how easy it is to build virtually any kind of site with its modules with no programming.
2) As a programmer discovering its APIs, Core and the ease and speed of module development.

Forget that it isn't 100% OOP, it has an excellent core / APIs and is an an absolute joy to work with. I wish I'd discovered it years ago.

Two books to help you:
1) (non programmers) O'Reilly, Using Drupal
2) Apress Pro Drupal Development, Second Edition
Posted By: Jeanne on August 17 2010 04:04 pm
I fully subscribe to Michael comment. Drupal has certainly been a good CMS and still is. But it is outdated:
Its developers are blindly focused on the past technology and totally offset the new ways to work with a CMS.

Posted By: G. Camdure on August 16 2010 04:06 pm
@ Michael: I fully agree. I used Drupal several years to finally get fed up with it.

At first it seems to be a superb CMS. But then you spend your time by facing all its hidden limitations.

For those who like it: go ahead. For the other ones don't worry, be happy: there are quite a few other CMS out there. Excellent ones.
Posted By: Michael on August 12 2010 03:05 pm
Drupal is like Joomla. Both CMS had their glory time. Both CMS were at high level a few years ago.

I know them both quite well for having used them several years. But I do not use them anymore, or only if a customer insists to have them (but this happens very seldom).

I do not use them anymore because today you find much better CMS: Modx, Silverstripe, Expression Engine to name just a few.
This new generation of CMS have little to compare with the 'old CMS': Drupal, Joomla, e107, etc.
Their whole philosophy is different.

Here are a few examples:
- Excellent caching (site performance and speed). Drupal and Joomla are both slow. Drupal becomes very slow once you have added a bunch of midules.
- Easy and flexible template system (you build whatever you want) with easy and full support of web standards (XHTML, CSS and Javascript). Forget Drupal and Joomla here. You will waste a lot of time and never be satisfied with the results.
- Well tested and bug-free (not like Drupal that has always security issues. Joomla is much better here.)
- Well documented: Drupal has a lot of information, but is it rather incomplete and not structured. Often it is outdated.
- Ressource (or asset) management. Drupal has never be able to have one. That means you can not manage the site pictures, or any other files properly.
Almost unbelievable, but Drupal has no file management.
This is due to the fact that ALL ressources (pictures, any files) are owned by a 'node' and not by the user. It will be a hard work for Drupal to change that, and I don't believe they ever will be able to do such a change.

The big issue with Drupal is once you have installed it you have a skeleton, this means for instance:
- no pictures!!!
- no editors
- a poor administration
- no spam protection
- no SEO
- no query
- no possibity to add no fields in pages
- no pingback / trackback
- no XML sitemaps
- no file browsing
- No communication (sending e-mails, messaging, etc.)
- etc.

In Drupal you can have most of these features in adding modules.
This is a big issue very well analysed by Jean: you would need to add and activate around 80 modules to have a decent website.
Modules are rarely up-to-date and if core has moved to a new version, you are always in conflict between 'old version' modules and 'new version' modules.

Worse, module developement is community driven. Very often, the module owner stops his developement after a few years of work and leave the community without follow up. This is a big issue when you have site in production. It ends often in paying huge amount to get customized developement.

The next issue due to modules is site speed: the more you add modules in Drupal, the slower it becomes. If you build a Drupal site with decent features, site speed will be a big issue.
You can use all caching option, add cache modules, etc. Speed will always be an issue.
I use only dedicated servers. That means Drupal speed problem is not due to hardware. Really, I would not like to have Drupal installed on a shared server.

The new generation of CMS have most of above mentionned features (and much more) in core. This mean by each new release, all these feature are up-to-date: you avoid the Drupal nightmare.

Thanks to their excellent caching system, speed with the new generation of CMS is just not an issue at all.
They are lightweight, literally flying. Highly flexible, performant, of course fully featured.
Posted By: gb on August 12 2010 03:12 am
drupal is very easy to use and powerful at the same time its among the best cms good work drupal.
Posted By: chaitanya on August 11 2010 09:21 am
looking nice.

needs to make it more simple for the beginer
Posted By: Barbie Girl on August 11 2010 08:58 am
Randy says: You want a clean admin interface (for your customers for example) forget Drupal: many other CMS have better admin interfaces.

Yeah, why would anyone recommend a cms for it's excellent admin interface, but is useless as a cms, that statement is utter garbage.

Drupal has it's flaws, but over all it is a cms that has serviced me well for over 3 years, I have tried others and have always returned to Drupal. Me saying that means that I don't think Drupal is perfect, but I have not found better as of yet, like thay say, "better the devil you know"
Posted By: Randy on August 10 2010 07:07 am
Craig says: Drupal DOES have a steep learning curve and (he) spent months in the past overcoming it. But he loves Drupal.

Fox find Drupal easy: even a carpenter knows how to operate Drupal and it is what linux is to Microsoft.
What a stupid statement !!! Be overwhelmed is OK. But to write such definitive statement shows your stupidity.

Mako Bosnic found Drupal a snap to pick up. But then he writes 'give it a go and don't give up soon'. Looks like the snap was a bit long !
And when he writes 'nothing is more powerful than Drupal'.
Then he must be said that his knowledge is quite limited...

Looks like people around are just reacting to comments rather than sharing their experience with Drupal.
This does not help at all.

I know Drupal, I used it for years (now I am using another CMS).

One can not judge a CMS by good or bad, black or white.
Everything depends on your requirements.
So first of all define your requirements and then check whether Drupal or any other CMS fits with them.

For example, you want a blog, just a blog?
Don't use Drupal, you're much better off with Wordpress.
Without doubts Drupal can do blogging, but the expert is WP.

You want a social website, go with Elgg. It is the killer CMS for this type of use.

You want a good generalist site with many features: Drupal is a good choice.

You want utmost flexibility in design. Simply forget Drupal and go for ModX.
Again, Drupal has some flexibility in design, but you can not compare it to ModX. Not at all.

You want a clean admin interface (for your customers for example) forget Drupal: many other CMS have better admin interfaces.

You want a very performant site (for example because you are on a shared server, or for any other reason): leave Drupal aside and go for Typo3 or Modx that have caching per page (Drupal has a bad cache system).

You want an picture gallery, you can use Drupal. But Menalto is much better for that specific use.

If you want a simple website but with blogging, news and pictures + a few other features. Go for cms made simple. Drupal is too big for that.

These are very basic examples, but gives you an idea how you should proceed when choosing a CMS.

Seldom you will have a CMS "better" than another one. You rather will have a CMS that fits better your needs than another one.

So claiming Drupal is good or bad means absolutely nothing. These general statements only show the stupidity of their authors.
Posted By: Marko Bosnic on August 7 2010 01:34 am
I don't believe these people here who are saying that Drupal is some kind of animal that's hard to tame, are you serious Craig calling people stupid, just like fox said, you proved to be the idiot here. I love Drupal and unlike Craig said, there are no hidden demons in Drupal, nor is it capable of any miraculous tasks, it is just a very powerful piece of kit, all I can say is, anyone flaming Drupal has just given up to quickly, I my self found it a snap to pick up, it is actually easier than Joomla. I am 21yo and not in the web game at all, I use it for my own personal use website, even updating Drupal is not so hard, so long as you follow the procedure, other wise you could end up with a few PHP errors, so give it a go and don't give up to soon, you will be glad you did, because there is nothing more powerful than Drupal.

Marko Bosnic
Posted By: Fox on August 5 2010 06:06 pm
Craig, stop playing with your barbies, even a "carpenter" new how to opperate this mega machine, all other CMS's don't come close to Drupal, Drupal is simply what Linux is to microsoft, better, but people are afraid of it because it is powerful, and it seems people like you, should stay away from it and continue playing with your easy WP script, calling people idiots because they know how to work Drupal makes you look like the idiot, how ironic, you have proved that you are the idiot here, "spent months overcoming drupal" LOL, all I can say is stay away from it if you have no clue.
Posted By: Bastone on August 5 2010 03:52 pm
Drupal is a big deception. Big, because when a CMS has such a fame it should at least perform better than any other CMS.

Drupal is average. One of the positive point is that it is easy to install and very easy to use. People that mention a steep learning curve (sorry Craig) must be a bit limited in their skills.
Drupal is nothing difficult to use.

One the other hand Drupal has a bloated code and is very slow. Not at first after installation. But you will see performances slowing down when you install modules.
The more modules you install the slower it is. I use only dedicated server, so imagine what it could be on shared servers.

Drupal has no flexibility in design. You have many templates, but (beside the fact that I find them not very nice) you will have a very hard time to do a design that meet your customer requirements. Be ready to spend a lot of time and frustration if you try.

OK, you have thousands of modules and this is very nice... at first. But when you dig a bit you see that you have Drupal has put in modules many features that other CMS have in core.
The issue is that the modules do not follow the strict development rules of the core. And you always have issues like deprecated modules, not up-to-date modules, etc.
So you install a module but you are never sure that it will be there in 2 years when Drupal will upgrade to a new version.

This being said, Drupal is certainly not a bad CMS. But all the noise done around it would make one believe that it is as great as the universe. It is really not the case and you can find much better CMS around : Expression Engine, Typo3, ModX, Silverstripe and other ones that give you everything that Drupal does not have.
Posted By: Craig on August 5 2010 05:36 am
Some of you idiots should actually try making something with Drupal instead of just downloading it and using it like Wordpress. Adding a few content posts is easy because it's a completely non-technical task.

I can see that the people who are saying Drupal is "easy" or "a medium level" CMS have absolutely no idea what Drupal is or is capable of. Drupal DOES have a steep learning curve and I know because I've spent months in the past overcoming it. That's why it's one of the most highly paid platforms to freelance with. Don't just evaluate it, try a couple of simple tasks and then comment like you're an expert. Most people who have commented here are too stupid to even understand what Drupal is designed to do.
Posted By: Konny on August 4 2010 02:34 pm
Humm... Drupal 6.0 stable release came out in early 2008. 20 months later we are at Drupal 6.14.
14 security releases within 20 months!
What is so messy about Drupal that they cannot have a stable release that is not full of security issues? I never seen that with other CMS.

By the way 14 releases in 20 months means an upgrade every 6 weeks.
To upgrade Drupal you have to turn your site off, backup the DB, change the template to have the core template working, turn off all modules (can easily be 80 modules on a normal featured site), delete all files on the server, replace them by the new ones, re-activate all modules, change template again, launch upgrade. If everything went well, you can put your site up again.
If not (but generally it does) you have to use your backed up DB and start again.

It is not a long process. And have to do it every 6 weeks is more than time consuming. It is waste of time. Especially when you have several sites running with Drupal and located on different servers.

The issue is even bigger if you have your customers using Drupal. Unless you want to leave your customers with security issues in their release, you have to upgrade them all.
That's where the fun is over, really.

Additional messy problems is when you upgrade from a previous version (let's say from Drupal 5 to Drupal 6). Then yes you have to check whether all your modules are up to day. And Jean is right, there's where the nightmare starts as Drupal is never up to date with its modules.
Posted By: Jack on July 30 2010 03:02 pm
Drupal is a CMS of medium class. Not the worst, not the best. It has a very unfriendly administration, it is slow, and has very little feature in the core.

One can add numerous features through additional modules. But yes, modules are a big issue. For example you will need to install several modules if you want pictures on your site. Not one sole module, but several. Same for music, videos, multilingual, editor, etc.
At the end one can have over 100 modules to have a decent site.
Problem is that these modules are NEVER up to date when a new version of Drupal is released.

It is true also that the more you install modules the more Drupal becomes slow. Very slow. I have never seen that with other CMS (I did 22 sites using Joomla, Wordpress, Drupal, Expression Engine and ModX).
Drupal has a poor cache system and therefore speed become a critical aspect.

Regarding design, Drupal has no flexibility at all. Compare it to ModX or Silverstripe and you will see that you only loose a lot of time when you try to design Drupal.

But as said Drupal is not the worst CMS. It has strong SEO and blog features.
Basically I would say it is a blog CMS that tried to become a website CMS. But this includes all the drawbacks of such a move.
Posted By: Antonello Lobianco on July 30 2010 03:51 am
I just read the comment of GoldPath.. and I am writing here just to say.. that I think the EXACT opposite ;-)

"For a personal site choose another CMS. For a professional: go ahead with Drupal."

While for small personal sites the complexity of Drupal "may" be unnecessary, for professionals is the price to pay for a unbeatable flexibility.

About the updates, while this could be a problem between major versions (but they are shipped every 2-3 years!) minor updates do not represent a problem.
There are modules (or even better command line tools like drush) that greatly simplify it.
I manage a multi-site installation with 5 important sites and several tens of installed modules and I very rarely have problems with updates (of course, -dev modules could be more problematic!).

Cheers..!
Posted By: GoldPath on July 25 2010 02:45 pm
Not convinced by Drupal at all. First I get the same functionlities with quite a few other CMS. Second, for a professional Drupal is a no go.

Nevertheless I found it simple to install (I tried Drupal 6.x) and not difficult to use. I do not understand why people mention a steep learning curve.

What I did not like in Drupal is the lack of flexibility for design. OK you have modules and all that stuff to help. But nothing at the level of CMS like Typo3, Silverstripe, ModX, CMS made simple, and a few others.

The other negative point is what Julia mentionned: the modules. A lot of modules but a big lack of consistency with the core, anarchical development that lead to security and maintenance issues.
Good CMS have their main features in core, not in modules, because this allow them to ensure the overall code quality.

But this said, Drupal is certainly not a bad CMS. Please do not exagerate. I recommand it for beginners, people that want to build their own site.
For people working with customer I would not recommand it due to the issue on modules.
There si a function to "automatically" upgrade modules on Drupal. But Drupal as a new release (due maily to security issues) every 2 months.
Would you have 100 customers with Drupal installed on several servers, forget the upgrade: it is a nightmare.

And as the modules do not follow the same release rythm than the core, you can get stuck quite fast.

For a personal site go ahead with Drupal. For a professionnal: choose another one.


Posted By: Woodie on July 25 2010 08:59 am
All I was trying to say is, that Drupal isn't as hard as they think, I understand that Drupal may not be the answer for everyone, but I was merely trying to state that people are saying it is hard, and that it takes "years to master" that is the crap part.
Posted By: rocco on July 22 2010 12:44 pm
a kingdom for a wrking news module . a simple news module...

thb i last tried drupal 5.x versions and even if it has some nice features and modules...but i couldn't find a way/module to post some regular news now and then...had to somehow implement an extra way to display content as news...thats not powerfull, thats sad! (even the unknown small cms can have a "news" functionality out of the box..)
not to mention some other things like file management..
Posted By: woodie on July 22 2010 08:56 am
Thanks Philip, I just don't understand if a carpenter can work it out after playing with it for a whole day, why can't people that are in the field, I just don't understand, but it is fair to say that Drupal does have a learning curve, but not as big as what people make out.
Posted By: Ryan on July 22 2010 06:10 am
@Woodie,
Insulting people does not bring much help to people who try to understand the pros and the cons of Drupal.

People that are commenting take time to share their experience. This experience sharing is highly valuable to any of us.
You might fully disagree with some comments and you are welcome to tell us why.
But please respect also the experience of others.

Maybe what you have discovered in Drupal is excellent for your use. But should accept that others look for other things in a CMS and that Drupal might not be the right answer for them.

At least we have understood that Drupal fulfills all carpenter needs! (I am kidding).
Posted By: philip on July 21 2010 07:32 am
I read a few comments and I tend to agree with Woody. I have not used Drupal and did some research before choosing Drupal. Now that I decided on Drupal I am teaching myself how it works and how to use it.

Another comment that caught my eye is by Julia regarding the lack of "file management" and "SEO" or search engine optimization.

First of all Drupal is a Content Management System. Content management is totally different to file management. CMS controls who can do what, i.e. who can create, edit and delete content as well as who can upload/download files and what type of files may be up/downloaded. File management only allows an authorized user to move (cut), copy and delete files. It also allows authorized users access to files for editing.

SEO is not a function of CMS. It is a function of the web designer creating web pages/sites. I have been designing web sites since 1995 when I took an online course through Compuserve titled "Create Web sites using HTML2". In that course I learned what is now called SEO. Because of this all my web sites are self-registering with all search engines within 6 months. Since I taught myself to create dynamic web sites using MySQL and PHP I have incorporated my SEO techniques into database to create SEO optimized dynamic pages that will self register with Google in less than a month.

My purpose for wanting a CMS is to extend the capabilities of my web sites by allowing specific users i.e. members to interact with the sites by adding/deleting their own content. Eventually I plan to allow members to upload/download files as well.

Julia spent quite a bit of time bashing Drupal then only offers one alternative to Drupal - Silverstripe. I checked out Silverstripe's web site but could not find and information their products other than what is referred to eye candy. Before I chose Drupal, I was considering Joomal, TextPatern and a few others that are supported by my web hosting provider. Drupal's web site developed my confidence in their system by providing basic technical background of the system, what it's capabilities are, how it may be used and how it's capabilities may be increased by adding modules (plugins). The only other CMS product that did this in the group I was researching is TextPatern. Drupal appeared to easier to learn.

Remember Drupal is not a web site creator, graphics/video/audio/flash editor. It is a content manager system that controls who can do what. You need to have those systems in place before you can manage who may use them.
Posted By: Richard on July 20 2010 07:06 pm
Amazing piece of software! Developing for Joomla since its Mambo days, until bumped into Drupal 6: it is bye Joomla ever since.
Not a CMS but a CMS builder. Small and lean building blocks, you can interconnect them to achieve the most complex requirement without writing a line of code most of the times. If you are a professional web designer, builder or developer, it's a no brainer, you'll not regret the 40 + hours you need to invest to get a hang of it.
Posted By: Woodie on July 18 2010 08:57 am
What a lot of crap these last 5 or 6 comments are, your all alot of babies, no file magement? go use GetSimple if this is to hard for you, I ain't a webprogramer & less a webdesigner, to be honest, I am a carpenter, & Drupal for me was hard to understand in the morning, but by the evening, I had it all worked out, "require years of studying" WTP? are you a comedian?, the flamers who flame drupal are just to lazy to get to know Drupal, I love drupal & I think it doesent take much to learn, & this is coming from a carpenter that works with timber every day, not a computer! "As i waiting for someone to burn me down".
Posted By: Julia on July 16 2010 12:30 pm
Drupal does not even have a file management system! What a pity.
Every file you upload is lost in a 'node'.
And the modules that try to do some kind of file management are far behind what can be find in other CMS.

Try to explain to any webmaster that the files that are uploaded can not be managed... A sad story, really.

Don't tell me that Drupal has thousands of modules. It is true and this is a real pain.

If Drupal has so many modules it is because the core is so poor. What are modules in Drupal are included in the core in other CMS.
For example you need a module to have a picture in your blog... you need a module to have text editor... you need several modules to be SEO... etc.
So thousands of modules exist mostly because Drupal has just a few feature in core.

So what?
This is where the pain starts. The modules do not follow strict development rules like it is the case of the core.
You can get some good modules, but often you get modules that open security issues, non core code compliance, etc.

Worse, just a few modules are maintained on the long haul. When you use a Drupal module, you are never sure that it still will be there in 3 years.

Last but not least, the Drupal modules are like the handbrake in a car: they slow down drastically your site performance (experienced on several dedicated servers).
Basically, the more you install modules, the slower your site.
This because what was said previously, anarchical module development non aligned with core.
As a result hundreds of thousands of DB queries happens when loading a page.

So, thousands of modules! Yes, and millions of tears...

Now if you compare Drupal to other CMS you see that since years (2007) Drupal has brought nothing new.

Other CMS are much more innovative (look at Silverstripe for example, but several other ones exist too).
Drupal is based on old technology and the CMS did not succeed so far in caching up the advance of the new generation of CMS.
Posted By: Jason K. on July 14 2010 02:00 pm
Sorry guys, with Drupal you cannot set up a website in minutes... unless you do not want any pictures, proper SEO, text editors, videos, music and so on.
You can have all these feature in Drupal (through additional modules), but then it will take you quite a while to get there AND you will see your site slowing down like crazy.
Drupal is awful when regarding speed.

Yes, Drupal has many features. Yes, you can do website with Drupal (hopefully!). But it is not user friendly, administration is crap and the technology is... outdated. YES!

Drupal has been a the top for years. This attracted a lot of developers to it, creating a huge community.
Obviously such a big community does a lot of noise claiming that this CMS is the 'best CMS'.
You can read all over the Web how perfect Drupal is. But guys, the World change every day, and the Internet too.
What was excellent 10 years ago is more than outdated today.

New CMS have been developped integrating the best of today's web technology. Drupal simply cannot compare with them.
To name only 2 of them: have a look at MODX or Expression Engine. Both of them have stable release that already are much more powerful than Drupal.
On top of that both of them will bring a new release (in beta stage right now) that will literally blow out Drupal, even the future Drupal 7.x.
Posted By: Smith on July 14 2010 04:03 am
@Visual guy
"The nerds who defend Drupal don't understand that many clients are completely overstrained with it, even just as users. It's alright for Linux people who know nothing about interface design and usability.

Chris: Drupal is for web*programmers*, not webdesigners. ""

Right. Absolutely Right.
Posted By: What's up with on July 13 2010 03:16 pm
Have read many post from developers or webdesigners dissing this, and loving that. Understandable, knowing where it comes from, but seen from a commercial perspective, then any serious web agency would have two or three CMS systems they use and they choose the one that fits the job at hand, the best!

It's no at one CMS Pony :)
Posted By: MWSam on July 13 2010 10:35 am
Many say that Drupal is a bit difficult to learn compared to other CMS, it's true. But it's partly due to its philosophy of being lean and slim while being easily extensible that make it hard to grasp in the beginning. Its true power come from its myriad of contributed modules. With the right combination of add-on modules, Drupal certainly the best, no doubt.
Posted By: Visual guy on July 11 2010 03:25 am
Very powerful, but too complicated. Requires years of study to be able to use it.

The nerds who defend Drupal don't understand that many clients are completely overstrained with it, even just as users. It's alright for Linux people who know nothing about interface design and usability.

Chris: Drupal is for web*programmers*, not webdesigners.

The template system is terrible, you hack a CSS file here, you hack one there, in the end you have double and triple definitions and none does what you want.
Posted By: dibbd on July 10 2010 09:01 am
Drupal takes a little more coding and administrative work than what I want. No doubt it's a powerful CMS, but if you're not familiar with PHP/MySQL, you may have some issues.

What killed Drupal for me was the pain of doing version updates, very often they'd crash and was a pain and scary to get them back up and running.
Posted By: Bruno Philipe on July 7 2010 06:23 pm
I loved it! After two installations and some bugs you learn how to work it and it is amazing! I have tried PHP-Fusion, Joomla!, WordPress and even IP.Board (That I have for another website of mine) and none of them was so versatile and powerful as drupal.
Congratulations! 5/5 stars!
Posted By: John Walling on July 7 2010 01:48 am
For those who think Drupal looks amateurish, check out these resources:
http://www.listology.com/jwalling/list/drupal-showcases-and-portfolios
http://www.listology.com/jwalling/list/drupal-theme-resources

For those who think Drupal is too slow, check out these resources:
http://drupal.org/node/627252 Managing site performance
http://drupal.org/project/memcache
http://drupal.org/project/boost
http://pressflow.org/ tuned Drupal stack
http://getpantheon.com/mercury/technical-info

If you need free heavy-duty tools for multi-site configuration management, check out these resources:
http://groups.drupal.org/aegir-hosting-system
http://drupal.org/project/drush
http://developmentseed.org/tags/drush

If you need a pre-configured Drupal distribution, check out these resources:
http://www.drupalgardens.com/features Drupal 7
http://acquia.com/ free or with support
http://www.prosepoint.org/ online publication
http://openatrium.com/ intranet/mini-ecm
http://openpublishapp.com/ online publication
http://managingnews.com/ news feeds and maps
http://civicrm.org/ CRM addon for Drupal/Joomla
http://www.ubercart.org/ online store
http://drupaldistrowatch.com/drupal/distributions

If you would like to browse Drupal web sites in the wild with case studies, check out this list:
http://www.listology.com/jwalling/list/drupal-web-sites-case-studies

If you would like to learn Drupal for beginners, check out this list:
http://www.listology.com/jwalling/list/drupal-beginner-resources



Posted By: Billh210 on July 6 2010 09:11 am
Your right, administration back end could use some simplification. Its very hard to navigate and find things easily. Look at Joomla they have the right Idea.
Posted By: Spyros on July 6 2010 06:33 am
I've used Joomla, Wordpress and Drupal.
Drupal has been the best option for me so far.
Wordpress - I don't even want to talk about - to me it's not far from Blogger.

The reasons I prefer Drupal are various.
First, hierarchical taxonomies. In contrast to WP and Joomla, you can build as complex trees of categories and subcategories as you like. Drupal 7 is going even further - do a Google search on "Drupal 7 review".

Second, Custom Content Types and Vies allow users to build and display ANYTHING they like in WHATEVER way they like. In Drupal 7 both of them are in the core.

Third, with Drupal, I know that ANYTHING is possible. ANYTHING can be customisable neither be it templating, theming, some other functionality...

Last, native forum, localisation, multi-blogging support.

Regarding performance, steep learning curve, maintenance, scalability, web 2.0, lack of functionalities in the core (that other people mentioned as drawbacks):
Drupal is about choice. No WYSIWYG editor in the core means you have the choice of WHICH editor you want to plug-in. No Image Gallery module in the core means - AGAIN - the same thing. There are hundreds of different ways of achieving things in Drupal. The decision should NOT be Drupal's but yours! Having said that, Drupal 7 brings lots of these modules - such as image, views, taxonomies, cck in the core. Drupal 7 also simplifies administration - if you want to see it for yourselves go to Drupalgardens and have a look.

Performance: Make a Google search on Drupal performance. You will see valid research putting Drupal amongst the fastest CMSs available. So far, I haven't had any problem with speed in my sites.

Maintenance: Yes, horrific so far. BUT Drupal 7 again is geared towards automatic updates so fingers crossed :)

To summarize: Drupal is extremely flexible, powerful and customisable.

However, it is important to note the following. Drupal is ideal ONLY for the user who:
1. Is passionate about technology and solutions and wants to build things "better", "faster", more "flexible"...
2. Enjoys UNDERSTANDING and wants to bring this understanding to his/her clients.
3. Enjoys hard work and diving in technical documentation to make things work THE WAY THEY want.

Drupal is NOT for the faint hearted, the lazy developer OR the every-day person who needs a publishing platform to express daily thoughts.

As ALL things good in life. Drupal too, needs commitment.

Hope this helps a few people
Posted By: Georg on July 3 2010 08:18 am
Yes Drupal is easy to use but has a very bad administration interface.
Posted By: efnina on June 28 2010 02:31 pm
Nice, its great to learn with this CMS
Posted By: aaaa on June 21 2010 12:04 pm
If you want an out-of-the-box solution then look at Acquia Drupal, if you need a scalable high performance version look at Pressflow - these are both configured distributions of Drupal (there are others to suit other needs).
Posted By: Ludwig on June 21 2010 03:00 am
After reading a few pages of these comments I would have to say that much of this is either extreme ignorance or deliberate disinformation. I rather suspect the latter.
The reality is Drupal is a solid content management framework that is infinity extensible and configurable.
If you want an out-of-the-box solution then look at Acquia Drupal, if you need a scalable high performance version look at Pressflow - these are both configured distributions of Drupal (there are others to suit other needs).
As a long term Drupal user/developer I will agree that you need to read the handbook and understand the structure but once you have jumped that style the game is on...
Posted By: Anon on June 17 2010 02:15 pm
@BigDaddy
I guess you've never been to the White House website.
Posted By: Chris on June 16 2010 01:14 pm
I read a lot of these comments. Look people, Drupal IS NOT that difficult. I read complaints about the templating system:

C'MON! Are you kidding me? Drupal theming is a piece of cake! A lot of the theming complaints should actually be with your template designer, not Drupal. If you get a commercial, or a very good free theme from like Top Notch Themes, then you'll see how super easy theming is in Drupal.

I recently designed a site for a client in Joomla... and the whole time I was wishing for Drupal theming.

Now let's look at mods: Drupal mods are free. In Joomla, you're gonna pay a crazy high amount for them. And I've yet to see Joomla have anything close to Views, CCK and WebForm. Sure, Joomla has K-2, FlexiContent... but let's be honest, there aren't anywhere near the quality of CCK. And as far as Views: Joomla has nothing like it. But don't get me wrong, I like Joomla (actually use it on one of my personal sites).

Now as far as speed:
Straight out of the box, Drupal is as fast (or faster) than any other CMS. But yeah, when you load it with mods, it does become terribly slow. Hopefully they'll solve this in D7.

No, Drupal isn't for beginners. Yeah, there's a very steep learning curve. But c'mon... if you're looking for something quick and easy then you're not really a web designer. I always recommend newbies stay away from BOTH Drupal and Joomla. Wordpress is for you.

Drupal is safe, stable, flexible, mature and is overall more powerful than any other CMS out there. Stop complaining and take the time to learn it properly... or move on to something easier.
Posted By: Ned The Bull on June 16 2010 09:21 am
@BigDaddy, everyone has there opinion, but with a comment like that, your the one that sounds amaturish, you obviously have not looked at the many different themes that are available, just like Joomla, if none of the free ones from the Drupal site strike your fancy, then check the theme monster site out (if you don't mind paying for them, but being a Joomla user, you would be paying for modules too).
Posted By: BigDaddy on June 11 2010 12:58 am
I am not a fan of Drupal. The sites look very amaturish... Joomla is better when it comes to a better looking site. I am disappointed that my client wants Drupal. Wow.... Not good.
Posted By: Cain on June 10 2010 04:23 pm
Drupal is good for beginners. A lot a templates, a lot of modules, easy to use.
But for developpers that build site for customers it is not the best CMS.
Template system is not flexible. You spend hours on hacking with no chance to meet your customer requirements.
Modules are numerous but not well maintained. It has happened to us that after having installed various modules for one of our customer, we had to update the site. For a specific module, it was then impossible to have an update and we had to code the full module again. A real shame and a real waste of time.

What we do not understand with Drupal is why they put so many feature under modules (not in core). In many other CMS the same feature are in core (text editor, image, cache, tempalte, and may other ones).

Finally, Drupal has a very bad cache system that leads to very bad performance. Just install a few modules and you will see the site performance slow down like crazy.
Posted By: Fannon on June 7 2010 10:08 am
Switched from Joomla to Drupal to build an complex Website that wouldn't be possible with Joomla at all.

Well, Drupal is not easy to begin with. It's getting sometimes very frustrating. But Drupal is worth the trouble in my opinion.

Sometimes I wonder if there is any good free CMS out there. I've tried a lot of them, especially the popular ones. Drupal still serves me best.
Posted By: John on May 31 2010 05:15 pm
Drupal... a lot of bloated stuff, but nothing really professional.
Redondant features, and slow, very slow.
One of the slowest CMS here around.

You always will fing people around claiming that Drupal is fast as the light. Let's dig a bit: if you use only the core, then Drupal is reasonably fast. If you install 10+ modules, Drupal is dealy slow.
The issue is, that you have to install modules, because the core is naked.
Big mess really.
Posted By: Jason on May 29 2010 04:11 pm
If you need to put as much money as Intel, Robbie, or the US government to make Drupal working... than forget it.

A CMS has to be a breeze.
Obviously Drupal has some big drawbacks.
Posted By: Peter on May 20 2010 11:55 am
For all people who are afraid of performance:

http://www.robbiewilliams.com/
http://www.commerce.gov/
http://appdeveloper.intel.com/en-us/
http://www.een.be/

I think if Intel, Robbie, and the US government are happy with performance and flexibility it will be fast enough for most developers out here.
Posted By: Jean on May 19 2010 11:48 am
A few years ago, being faced with the Joomla limits I reviewed many CMS and chose Drupal.
Drupal has a clean code, very-well documented, has many features, an enormous amount of modules, a powerful community (one knows how important this is when choosing a CMS), a lot of information on the site.

But what made the decision was that Drupal is 'born' SEO. It is a delicious piece of code for search engine.
Furthermore, Drupal is known to be lightweight, a few MB only. This is only a thumb rule, but code weight has its meaning too.
A last, Drupal has some exceptional modules: Ubercart (ecommerce), Views, Taxonomy, CCK.
All these pluses did that I could accept an administration interface that is under average and the fact that you need to install many modules before one can actually have a decent working site.

I did some nice blogs and little sites with Drupal. But when I wanted to do big stuff, that is where the many pluses of Drupal became its worst enemies.

The code is light? Yes, but because the core has very few features. If you want a decent site, then you have to install at least 20-30 modules. Note that these modules are only standard feature in other CMS.

For example if you want full SEO one has to install following modules: metatag, pathauto, path, token, global redirect, xml sitemap and enable clean URL. That's 6 modules. For Multilingual feature you need to install 8 modules or more if you want also localization.

Many other CMS have SEO or multilingual feature integrated in core.
Then, what does it means that Drupal is light when you need to install 2, 3, 4, 5 plus modules for each feature?
Drupal is light only because most of its features are modules (non core) whereas they are in core in other CMS.

You want to add a field on a post? Please, install first a bunch of modules (CCK for instance). You want to add pictures, same thing, first install some modules.

I still could accept this additional work because, as said, Drupal has some great pluses.
But it has been a mistake.

The core is a strictly followed piece of code. But this is not the case of most of the modules. Their development is anarchical and often goes nowhere.
Furthermore, often they do not respect the core standards and therefore lead to quite a few code overlap and non-coherence. This is a real issue, as you must install many modules to build a normal site.

For example if you have used the image module in Drupal 5.x and you have upgraded to Drupal 6.x (Drupal 6.x is out since late 2007), well you won't have a stable release for the image module under Drupal 6.x. It is still under development!
Do you think you need pictures on your site? Well, be warned.

This is not a lonely case. Many modules are still not stable today despite the fact that the new version is out since a long time.
So we read here and there that Drupal 7.x will come very soon. Many developers get nervous and would rather the 6.x release to be entirely stable (module included).

Furthermore, the module issue is exacerbated by the fact that module development is not consistent.

Take the image gallery module (this one also has no stable version for Drupal 6.x) it comes in competition with the acidfree module (another image gallery module), with the Gallery module (a bridge to Menalto), the imagefield gallery, etc.
All of them give a share of what you need, but none of them gives really all what you need.

The anarchical way of developing modules leads to a full lack of control over the code quality and the module features. More importantly, you never can be sure whether the module will be upgraded to the next release.
This shows clearly the limits of having the standard feature developed in modules.
This shows also the negative side of having so many modules. Many modules only serve when developed under a coherent purpose.

The next problem starts when you have to update all your modules. A nightmare. Imagine updates that need to be done every 1-2 month or so on a multitude of modules. Horrible maintenance. Especially if you have sites installed on different servers (hosting depends often on clients).
On top of that updates are not always working properly (remember the modules do rarely follow the core standards regarding development).
In short you loose a lot of time for a lot of frustration.
On top of that, if you have done the mistake to upgrade to Drupal 6.x you inevitably faced with modules that did not move from 5.x to 6.x.

The other bad side is the more you add Modules in drupal, the slower the site becomes. It is almost mathematic. Drupal is fast when it has only a few modules installed, but it is dramatically slow when you want a normal featured site.

OK, you can always tweak and optimize here and there (and also install additional modules for caching). And out there you will find Drupal sites running at normal speed. But if one puts identical optimization efforts with another CMS he would have the impression to pilot a racing car weight ahead of what Drupal could do.
Warning: if you plan to use Drupal on a shared hosting, simply forget it.

Compared to ModX or Expression Engine, Drupal is here the big looser.
As users tend to leave site that are slow, this is a real issue.
If you plan a community site or a high traffic site, Drupal is definitively not a good choice.

Therefore I would say that the many modules of Drupal are also its biggest drawback: Drupal is nothing without many installed modules, Drupal is a nightmare when many modules are installed.

On top of SEO and speed, the other thing that is critical to developers is: template.
Here I won't be long as many other comments already point out this feature.
Drupal is definitively 10 years behind CMS like Silverstripe, Typolight, ModX, CMSmadesimple, Expression Engine, etc: Drupal has no freedom, design is forced, no flexibility.

Have a look at the Drupal themes on the Drupal site: they are not nice looking and you can not propose them to a customer.
You want to use a free or even to buy one (xhtml/css)? It is wasted time and money as the template system of Drupal won't allow you to use it. Or you will need to spend so much time for tweaking that the bill on the customer side will skyrocket.
Look at the Drupal site and you will have an idea of what I mean with not good looking design.

Even if Drupal would decide to change its temple system, it would lead to such a lot of work that it is not foreseeable before many years.

To conclude I would say that Drupal has been a top technology when facing the well-known Mambo / Joomla, but it has missed the quantum leap initiated by other CMS.
Posted By: Dr. Michael Chia on May 18 2010 10:51 am
Yes it is true. Very user unfriendly. You wouldn't know what to do even you have downloaded the software. The lessons are useless because you can't even install it. So, don't expect much from it.

Posted By: siva on May 18 2010 12:28 am
You can do anything you want with design using drupal. It just takes experience.
Posted By: Gonza on May 15 2010 05:08 am
Sorry guys, with Drupal you cannot set up a website in minutes... unless you do not want any pictures, proper SEO, text editors, videos, music and so on.
True, you can have all these feature in Drupal (through additional modules), but then it will take you quite a while to get there AND you will see your site slowing down like crazy.
Drupal is awful when regarding speed.

Yes, Drupal has many features. Yes, you can do website with Drupal (hopefully!). But it is not user friendly, administration is crap and the technology is... outdated. YES!

Drupal has been a the top for years. This attracted a lot of developers to it, creating a huge community.
Obviously such a big community does a lot of noise claiming that this CMS is the 'best CMS'.
You can read all over the Web how perfect Drupal is. But guys, the World change every day, and the Internet too.
What was excellent 10 years ago is more than outdated today.

New CMS have been developped integrating the best of today's web technology. Drupal simply cannot compare with them.
To name only 2 of them: have a look at MODX or Expression Engine. Both of them have stable release that already are much more powerful than Drupal.
On top of that both of them will bring a new release (in beta stage right now) that will literally blow out Drupal, even the future Drupal 7.x.
By the way the first tests of Drupal 7.x show that this version is even slower than Drupal 6.x. What a pity...
Posted By: Term Papers on May 13 2010 08:04 am

It's great to see fresh, creative ideas that have never been done before.
Posted By: Spoon Man on May 12 2010 10:56 am
Can't beat this, I keep trying other scripts, but keep coming back to Drupal, I think it's pretty easy to administer to. Drupal is what a cms should be. Just for the record, I have built many Joomla sites for clients, and there is no comparison, if people ask me to suggest an cms, Drupal is my answer without a second thought.
Posted By: Jorge on April 29 2010 08:44 am
I love this CMS, especially when I saw NASA using it in one of their centers website.

Hooooooorrrray for Drupal
Posted By: rekzkarz on April 27 2010 08:55 pm
Earthv2.org
is a drupal
baby.

Waaaaaaaaaaaah!
Posted By: AVINASH on April 27 2010 05:18 am
DRUPAL PLAYS AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN WEB APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT. IT WORKS LIKE AN ENERGY IN YOUR BODY.
Posted By: jack__h on April 23 2010 09:06 pm
The drupal is very strong
Posted By: generalelektrix on April 19 2010 08:18 am
Learning curve is steep for someone who really want to control the software and his environment. Indeed, the fun starts when you understand the logic of the framework. You can start up a fresh site in a matter of minutes, but you're not going to do anything really fancy until you begin using and building your own modules. There are so many modules to do almost anything you might dream about. If you already know a scripting language like PHP, Python or Perl, you're in for some great fun!
Posted By: JayD on April 15 2010 08:52 pm
Hey guys, I need to know if drupal is satisfactory for a school type site, where the teachers or kids have seperate logins and they can easily add content, upload pics, videos. Bomb proof so they can only select certain aspects like font sizes etc. And be relatively easy to use. I am looking for a drupal expert or CMS expert, email me at rabiddingoltd@gmail.com
Posted By: domingo on April 14 2010 09:42 am
Out of the box... Joomla and Drupal.
Those CMS are designed for the "mass" for everybody.

You will never become a software engineer or a real website designer with those toys Joomla and Drupal and others. The real work is behing the scene what you do not see... CODING. Just like D.O.S. is behind Windows operating system.

But we need those 'toys' so everybody can express themselves easily on the web.

Have a nice day.
Posted By: guest on April 11 2010 08:25 am
Drupal is one of the most secure cms, but slow without cache when using more addons.
Posted By: foobar on April 5 2010 02:04 pm
All these people complaining about steep learning curve, performance, skinnability, quality of the code or advancedness of the technology are probably amateurs and don't know what they are talking about.

Drupal isn't just a CMS, it is a Content Management Framework, which lets you build practically anything by combining some modules e.g. a blog site, a shop, wiki, publishing site with complex workflow, anything! Learn a few modules such as CCK, views, path-auto and learn how to skin it i.e. start with the Zen theme.

So many times, I've needed a new feature and every time there has been a module to do exactly what I want. Steep learning curve? I don't see it, just get the O'Reilly
'Using Drupal Book'.
Posted By: Anonymous on April 1 2010 11:41 pm
You can do anything you want with design using drupal. It just takes experience.
Posted By: Jenny on March 29 2010 04:20 am
I use Drupal for several years now. It used to be a good CMS.
Like others it has some strong points and some weak ones.
Today I prefer to use other CMS that are more advanced technologically.
Jenny
Posted By: Alexei Rayu on March 29 2010 02:48 am
Drupal is very stable, very great for theming. Very great for how very complex solutions like views and CCK and panels modules integrate. I can see why all big companies are switching to it. One unescapeable minus - is that it has a steep learning curve. But from all the growth that Drupal is having, it seems to be a valuable investment.
Posted By: Jay August on March 23 2010 08:06 am
@Nastua after reading your reply, I can only conclude that you have absolutely no idea what you're talking about.

no per page template? read about the Anatomy of a Drupal Theme
Drupal has not flexibility in design. It is a real pain to customize the template. -> false. it has the singlemost flexible templating solution EVER. Its not my fault you dont understand hooks, views and taxonomy right?

All your remarks can be kicked in the ground by a good drupal developer, and obviously you're not one.
Posted By: parasolx on March 22 2010 10:50 am
What ever comments, critics or people said, one thing that can proved Drupal is at the top of other CMS, it had won twice consecutively.

Kicking all the CMS at the same par. Thats all.
Posted By: Larocca on March 19 2010 04:39 am
Drupal is like Joomla. Both system offer more or less the same : a lot of features, many templates.
Difference between both systems is that in Drupal you need to install modules to add features whereas in Joomla the core already includes many features.

This is were Joomla is better than Drupal: adding modules is always awkward because their development does not correspond to the core development. Drupal has a lot of modules that are not maintained anymore.
On the other hand, Drupal is better than Joomla in the way the code is written.

Both system are easy to install and out of the box. Very easy to use for new comers. This good side includes its own drawback: out of the bow systems implies limitations in flexibility.
Both, Drupal and Joomla have a limited flexibility. Unless you have a budget like the one of a huge company, you will hardly been able to design exactly what you want with these 2 CMS.
Other CMS (Silverstrip, Typolight, ModX, Simple CMS and many other) have design flexibility in core. It is so easy with them to design a site.

If you consider flexibility to add feature. Drupal is certainly easier than Joomla. With both you can easily develop new features.
But it has to be said that you can also develop easily new features with almost any CMS.

If you consider extendability (extend the CMS features with existing modules) then both Joomla and Drupal are very rich. Few CMS will do better (Plone, Typo3, EZ Publish for example). But again these 2 CMS have thousands of modules to help to extend the CMS.

But despite you have such a huge number of modules, you hardly will find top level modules (usually nothing I will use for customers).
For example in Drupal you have many modules that allow you to display pictures. None of them is fascinating. It is basic technology.
You have also loads of modules to install a text editor. But in many other CMS, text editor is in core.
So numerous modules, but usually basic and redundant.
This is OK for a personal site, but for professional work it is insufficient.

Reading other comments here below, I agree that Drupal has bad performances. Other CMS, in same environment, are much faster.

Considering that the 3 most important characteristics of the Internet are: performance, design and features, Drupal answer only one of them (features) through its numerous modules.

I would make much more sense to have less modules but much better performance and a total design freedom as it is the case for other CMS.

But again, if you have a little site (or a budget with millions in it) and can accept templates how they are, you'll be satisfied with both Joomla or Drupal.
Posted By: hula on March 19 2010 02:41 am
i m advance php programmer ,and I don't like drupal
Posted By: Cayeno on March 14 2010 10:15 am
Drupal is a good CMS for non skilled people that need a system out of the box.
It is a feature rich CMS that you will be able to use in little time.

Saying that some big companies use it is ridiculous as the average Drupal user do not have the immense budget of these organization.

Anyway, for new comers Drupal is perfect.

The only major drawback I see is the bad performance of Drupal, even on dedicated servers (when compared to other CMS).

If you need more sophistication, then you will get into trouble.
As independent developer working for customers I do not like to use it: I prefer the flexibility of other CMS.
Customers want their own design and sometimes very specific layout. Drupal is definitively not done for such tasks. Sure one can do some template customization in Drupal, but the required flexibility is far from what other CMS offer.

Next issue are all the modules you need to install and to maintain. Customers get crazy about them and you spend an horrific time to run after issues that should not exist.
On top of that modules are often discontinued and it has happened many times that we were obliged to develop on our own modules that were no more followed up. A real pain and a real cost.

At last performance issue. Drupal has a bad caching system way below what many other CMS offer. This is also very critical for customers.

But if your project is to use Drupal for your own site, then you should be quite happy with it.
Nevertheless you should be interested in more modern CMS: true, Drupal is outdated.
Posted By: GetLives (getlives.com) on March 12 2010 01:33 am
Drupal 6 is wonderful, but it's not for everyone. If you're an advanced PHP user, Drupal's not worth your time, but if you can't code your own CMS and don't like Joomla, Drupal is the next best thing.

Word of caution, the performance of Drupal is very bad. Large sites need to avoid using Drupal. Communities need to avoid Drupal, too. If you need a community-oriented CMS, try e107, but be warned, e107 is not as pretty as Drupal.
Posted By: chickenlegs on March 11 2010 11:17 am
I spent a long time evaluating CMS systems and delighted to have gone for Drupal. Out of the box it is quite basic in terms of modules so the demo doesn't do it justice but with the plethora of quality modules you can do just about anything; wiki, blog, brochure site, online shop, gallery site etc.

I cannot understand people saying it is outdated, hard to use and hard to skin. You can do all the above without touching one line of PHP and skin a site by understanding the theme system and knowing some HTML, CSS, very basic PHP statement e.g. if() echo . Don't believe me, flick through the excellent O'Reilly book 'Using Drupal'.

Don't think that companies like Yahoo use it because with all their skilled developers they have the knowledge to use it, it is more likely they don't want to waste one second of time developing things others already have.





Posted By: Joel on March 9 2010 06:15 am
Like Joomla, Drupal is a enormous system. There is not much difference between both of them.
A new comer can do a site without spending a lot of time: everything is out of the box.

This kind of system are a real fun for non developers.
You can virtually do a bit of everything with them.

But this is also their main problem. Being able to do everything means also doing nothing in-depth.

Drupal especially is bad here.
Many modules to extend the CMS, but nothing really brilliant.
E-commerce? You have better systems out there. Gallery? same. Blog? same. Etc.

But the main issue with Drupal is its bad performance.
Once you install 40-50 modules in Drupal, you can see the performance totally down.
Problem is with Drupal: you have to instll many modules to have a decent site.
Joomla and other system are much faster.

Last problem of Drupal: no design flexibility at all.
Don't tell me about some Zen template, etc. This is not at all flexibility, but rather a try to enhance a bad situation.
Posted By: Alexa on March 4 2010 11:25 pm
Simply the best!

It does everything that one needs for most websites.

I am not sure whether I am stupid or very clever but I found Drupal much easier and more friendly to use than Joomla and many others, in spite of the claims of others to be "simple".

Maybe it's because I don't believe in god, so, not having to waste time in temples, mosques, churches or synagogues, gives me extra time to find out how to make a decent website with Drupal!
Posted By: Marion on February 28 2010 09:56 am
Even if Drupal is outdated as a CMS you still will be able to build a decent website.

If you need flexibility in design (for your customers for example) you'll be dead.
Sure you always can hack Drupal themes, but what a lost of time for a not satisfying result.
If you are ready to accept the free available template, you'll be happy.

Well,it has to be said that you still can do some design customization with Zen template for instance. But this is far behind the flexibility offered by many other CMS (Silverstripe for example).

So, the comments here below are not at all relevant when they claim flexibility for Drupal templating system. They do not refer to the same world and to the same kind of flexibility.

The good point of Drupal is its numerous modules that allows users to customize / extend the website.

The worst point of Drupal is its extremely bad performance.
We have tested Drupal and 15 other CMS on dedicated servers. Drupal has been one of the worst in performances.

OK, I have to say here that we did install around 30 modules. If you install no modules, Drupal will be OK in performances.
But we did the test with 30 modules installed because if you want to run a basic website, you need at least to install 40+ modules.
Because what you find in core in many other CMS are modules in Drupal (pictures, blog, text editor, etc.).

We could see with Drupal that the more you install modules, the worse the performances are.
Performance issues in Drupal are due to the bad cache system. Drupal need a full code redesign here. But as far as you can see what's going on in the next release (Drupal 7) this matter is not solved.

So, bad performances and no poor design flexibility, what can you then offer to your customers?





Posted By: Chase_D on February 26 2010 04:12 pm
Look, I see so many comments here about "Drupal is not easy to customize... not easy to customize look and feel, the templates, etc"...

Yeah, blah blah blah! The honest truth is that Drupal is so darn simple to customize. It's a total piece of cake for me to mod a template and develop something custom-looking. Now some of the free templates out there for D are not so great, and are not so easy to hack. But in all honesty, the majority of them are well designed.

Now as far as templates, I use the awesome "Zen" for some things. But for the majority of what I do, I only use templates from one team: Top Notch Themes. TNT's free themes, like Acquia Prosper and Marina are absolutely beautiful. And the Fusion theme offers a TON of flexibility, from point N click css changes to on-the-fly dynamic changes.


Those of you who are complaining about Drupal not being easy to customize are 100% wrong. First, if you're gonna custom a theme, you need to have certain foundation knowledge, like knowledge of CSS, HTML and php. If you don't have that then yeah, it's gonna seem daunting to you. But then again, any cms will be daunting to customize.

But if you have at least some of the fundamental knowledge then hacking Drupal themes should pose absolutely no "real" challenge to you. And the reason why I use Top Notch Themes is because the code is laid out perfectly. Heck, even a beginner can customize a TNT template. And with "Zen", it tells you exactly what to do and what css functions control what.


As for Drupal itself: I've found NO OTHER cms that comes close to what Drupal is as a whole. Maybe Drupal is not for beginners... and it does have a steep learning curve... but c'mon people, it's not "that" bad. Once you learn Drupal, it becomes such a snap. I can create a page of content in 2 minutes. To me, Drupal is the "big dog" of CMS. Forget the absolutely silly Joomla! Drupal leaves it in the dust. And... when D7 comes out, it will address most of these complaints.

If you're blogging or just "playing around", then go for Word Press or Joomla! But if you're truly serious about a web design, and want the ultimate flexibility and power, then you will NEVER go wrong with Drupal. Like someone said: "If you can't do it with Drupal, then you probably shouldn't be doing it".
Posted By: EricInWisconsin on February 25 2010 04:01 pm
Yes, Drupal has a steep learning curve, but once you're past that initial intimidation, it's hard to find something that Drupal CAN'T do! It's just a matter of choosing the right modules and configuring them to suit you. Drupal can create any type of site, from a simple page to ecommerce to a social network site. It took me about a month of working with Drupal before something just went "click" in my head and I "got it". It's not a great blogging CMS out-of-the-box like Wordpress is, but it can be configured to give WP a run for its money. Check it out and keep working with it. It's worth the effort.
Posted By: Eric Thomsan on February 25 2010 02:19 am
Good CMS For E-Commerse
Posted By: Admin on February 25 2010 02:16 am
Best CMS Drupal is to CMS systems what Linux is to Operating Systems. That is, the installation of Drupal is extremely easy and clear, the messages when something is missing (permissions and requirements) are clear and simple... but when you get down to it and start trying to build anything other than static pages or "stories" (whatever those are) you are faced with a godawfully steep learning curve. It seems Drupal would require a few books and some months before I could even pretend to know what's going on and how to actually use it.
Posted By: emi on February 18 2010 11:50 am
Drupal theming and templating is possible and completely customizable, for (plenty) all the modules you have to install. And you can do all of this inside your custom theme, which you can copy and rename from other one (as genesis or zend, for example) or just make a subtheme with just the modifications you need from the original.

You can completely customize/template as you like core features, views, CCK, imagecache, and a long etc. You'll only need how to name each file/function replaces the original. And you can easily know this by installing the Devel modules. Great job!

Updating modules and core is no more painful if you have shell access to your installation. You'll only need to download a tool named drush: DRUpal SHell. Just type drush update and all your modules will be automatically downloaded and installed as needed. Only some non-free parts need some more job.

Performance may be very bad depending on the configuration you use. If you use views, check all of them have caching enabled. If you install most important modules (Views, CCK), you can do much of the work without installing much more (may be noderefence and custombreadcrumb), but templating on your theme. Also, you can install modules that use templating system (imagecache, multiple views extensions), that is executed and downloaded only when it is needed.

If your site is mainly visited by anonymous users and robots/spiders, you can install a great caching module: boost. This module makes a file for each page an anonymous visitor views. With that, PHP and MySQL execution falls until 0 for most of your visitors (depending on the amount of visitors and pages and the need of updated data). You can also combine this with other great cache modules that will be able to cache any block your modules can create in any basis (per user, per role, per page, etc): Block Cache.

Extensibility is, as you know, the great key on Drupal. But the problem is that you need to know a very huge API. If you are a professional and know programing, you'll probably prefer to know very well Drupal than having to learn lots of other CMSs APIs and workflows. In fact, if you do so, you'll be able to greatly help improve this tool, adding caching to the modules you use, creating new modules or modules extensions, creating new themes, helping to debug the core or the modules, etc.
Posted By: Igor Nuriev on February 17 2010 04:32 am
As a developer I have worked over 5 years with Drupal and I know this CMS inside out.

Drupal has certainly been an excellent CMS in the past. Most of the issues raised here below wouldn't have been mentioned 4-5 years ago as Drupal was one of the best CMS around.

But since then a new generation of CMS came along (EE, ModX, Silverstripe, Typolight and others).
Drupal looks old when compared to them.

For example, many of the beautiful Drupal modules are in core in other CMS.
These has the avantage to avoid the ceaseless issues of upgrading the modules. It also gives a consistent feature development in these CMS, whereas this consistency does not exist between Drupal core and Drupal modules.

Drupal did not understand the new tecnical trends, there were no great innovations these last years. Drupal 6.x has been a real pain (Since its launch in 2007, the modules are still not yet all upgraded).

The community is quite worried about the will of the Drupal CMS founder to drive the community development toward the interests of his commercial company (Acquia).

Nevertheless anybody (and especially those who need out of the box solution) will be able to make a website with Drupal.
I would recommend Drupal for new comers with little or no coding knowledge.

For developers that want to play around and have fun in developing modules, Drupal is certainly a nice tool.

For developers that work with customers, just forget it.
Here Drupal lacks every bit of flexibility (template). Trying to hack it is feasible but a real pain.
Furthermore, Drupal performances are poor.
If you need professionnal CMS, look at the new generation of CMS that are brilliant when flexibility and performance are concerned.


Posted By: Mean Old Man with No Legs on February 9 2010 10:51 pm
Basically, if it can't be done with Drupal, you shouldn't be trying to do it. Drupal is the final solution for ANY website, from a personal blog, a forum with 500,000 users, or a multi-language corporate website. Drupal is supremely flexible, incredibly powerful, and yet simple enough for all but the dumbest users. The majority of the most complex website administration and development tasks are handled via superb add-on modules and a point-and-click admin interface. Better yet, it is extremely secure. I don't normally rave about software, but Drupal is unmatched. 5/5 stars.
Posted By: imrubio on February 9 2010 02:37 am
Many of these negative comments sound like they're coming from developers who need a bit of hand-holding and want something quick and easy. Drupal is very customizable but because of that fact, choosing the appropriate modules can be intimidating. Here's what I install for any basic Drupal 6.x site.
Views, CCK, WYSIWYG API, TinyMCE editor, PathAuto, IMCE, Admin Menu and sometimes Panels.
Views and Admin Menu are a must. Admin Menu provides a bar at the top of all pages whenever you're logged in with edit capabilities.
Add IMCE_Mkdir to create and delete directories for file and image management.
A major plus of other CMS such as Joomla, Sitecore, Ektron, Wordpress, etc is a consistent editing interface. This was one of the annoying pieces missing from Drupal but I overcame this using the Rootcandy theme for administration.
Now I am very happy with Drupal and would not consider using another CMS unless I absolutely have to.
Posted By: Eliza Sahoo on February 9 2010 01:46 am
It was a good one.Even i want to add to this
While working a Drupal project I faced a situation in which I could not access the login page. But I needed admin access to proceed with my task, so I had to look for a work-around and found that the login page could be accessed my manipulating the URL and adding the username.

www.mywebsite.com/user or www.mywebsite.com/?q=user

Using the above URL you can access the login page of the user.
Posted By: Nastua on February 7 2010 03:09 pm
Drupal is not dome for developers but rather for non tech users.
It is out of the bow with many options and features.
It is nice to play with.
If you are ahppy with the default templates, and if you don't bother to much about performance, just go ahead.

But if you are serious about developing websites, you want to try other CMS.
Drupal has not flexibility in design. It is a real pain to customize the template.
Simply forget to have a per page template.

Drupal is also very poor in performance when compared to average CMS.
This is due to his very poor caching.
Furthermore, when you add modules, your site just slow down like crazy because the modules do not support caching (or very poorly).

The big issue is that one need to install quite a few modules (minimum 50-60 for a medium site). Once you've done that your speed is dead.

So Drupal is OK for beginners to play with, and it is perfect if you have a lot of time to spend.

But if you are developing for customers, just forget it.
Posted By: Term Papers on February 4 2010 03:52 am
I don't want to give you a Lengthy comments.I just want to say that this software is unique and useful and also easy to use.

Term papers
Posted By: John S. on February 2 2010 04:32 pm
If you are a programmer and you wonder which CMS you should use to set up a medium-sized website with custom layout and some custom functionality then AVOID DRUPAL!

It's really messy, it's callback system is screwed, you don't have good control over the events, making custom layout is A LOT of work and it's very slow. Don't believe those silly benchmarks which shows how fast it is when you run an installation out of the box with caching turned on. Most of the modules you will need doesn't support caching well, which results in a big, slow system and there's really no easy way to speed it up.

On the other hand, if you're not a programmer and you need a CMS which works out of the box and you're ok with default templates then it's a system for you.
Posted By: Stryd on January 28 2010 03:41 pm
Wow,I was just considering moving from Joomla to Drupal,reason being the lack of integration among Joomla extension and the inability to build a unified system but simply having tens of little scripts minding independant duties and no chance whatsoever of formulating a dynamic and feature packed site.For example,the gallery component is unable to integrate with the ecommerce component(virtuemart) and give you the ability showcase the product with sophisticated visual expression,you're still stuck with virtuemart's limitations and the gallery component isn't even aware of virtuemart's existence.I was told that Drupal would be more expandable and that it is more possible to turn drupal into a wizard with it's thousands of modules but I was also warned that it was for einsteins,but I thought it would take only a few days to get the hang of it.But it seems the more I read about it the more it becomes aparent that I'm in for some serious stress and depression and it would be wise to change my mind about Drupal and seek a simpler and yet more versatile CMS.One of my main priorities is SEO,along with ecommerce and user interactivity and I was told by Drupal users at their forum that this would be a breeze with Drupal,but it seems to be contrary to my readings all over the internet.I will be searching for a more usable CMS out of the box and simpler to understand and use than what I've seen,Joomla is easy enough but it's ancient,I also considered TikiWiki but it's not that easy use either,although it has more features out of the box than most CMSes I've seen or read about.I am a novice to basic webmaster and haven't the skill to make good use of complex a CMS or manage upgrades and hi-tech maintenance.It seems I will need better advice in order to make reasoble decisions when it comes to selecting appropriate CMS.
Posted By: Mitch on January 27 2010 04:28 pm
Having worked in enterprises big and small, institutional and commercial, I have to point out that Drupal has two things going for it that make it appealing to the former (big, institutional) but less so to the latter (small, commercial): features cannot be found distributed as self-contained "salable parts" but must be assembled from more primitive functions (which in Drupal are collected as "modules"); and for practical purposes the deployment and maintenance path requires a team effort. Together these (that is to say, a bureaucracy).

Not to imply that a lone developer cannot deploy a Drupal site. But each salable feature requires some amount of abstraction and innovation to deploy, rather than being a matter of plug-and-play. Thus a substantial amount of the reputed steep learning curve of deploying Drupal is repeated for every salable feature you need to deploy.

A simile I use is to compare deploying a Drupal site to buying a car by shopping for a chasis and drivetrain, then the stamped sheet metal, windshield, seating, and so on. Unless you're in the business of building cars, you should instead buy the whole car plus or minus some salable options. In the same way, the Drupal site creator often must act in a development capacity much more than he or she might with some other systems: unless you are in the business of deploying Web sites and supporting them indefinitely for monetary gain, Drupal is a poor choice.

For instance, consider a portfolio. Depending upon how you deploy it may require several distinct but interdependent modules -- none of which are a prepackaged portfolio -- and special-purpose creation of a set of nodes to get the behavior that could be collectively called "The Portfolio". If you are smart, you'll have either a good mentor or a good reference book to show you recipes you can reuse. If you are lucky, the recipes will not be completely broken for the particular versions of modules and Drupal you are using. In any case, you have to follow a recipe in order to, in essence, develop a one-of instance of the portfolio "salable feature" on the site. I suspect this is the real reason Drupal never spawned a strong third-party commercial add-on market. But it is also a house of cards, and changes to (or problems in) the modules or nodes can make it come crashing down. Never mind the processes and procedures you need to institute in order to secure and maintain the site over time.

Most big institutions and cradle-to-the-grave service providers have enough staff to maintain a sufficiently high level of maturity to keep Drupal based deployments going, and the need for that maturity level is a form of job security for those hired as administrators. In this sense it is reminds me of the connection between the position of "Database Administrator" and adoption of Oracle RDBMS. But many smaller operations cannot afford the overhead, even those of us who are hard-core developers just putting up our own site. Unless we are getting paid to be creative, it is a very poor utilization of our time.
Posted By: Randy Ball on January 25 2010 09:52 am
I agree with most of what Raoul says.
Drupal is bloated and most of the features you install through modules are not really exceptionnal. In the contrary many modules are quite poor.

On the other hand there are some very good modules, but other CMS have these features in core.

For example the CCK module is seen as one of the best of Drupal. This module allows customized field. It might be a great module but in many other CMS 'custom field' is in core (ModX, Silverstripe for example).

Views module? Same thing, it is an excellent module. But you can find it in core of several other CMS (EE for example).

Yes Drupal is OK. I won't say it is not.
But it is not at all above other CMS.

Personally, I find all these modules installation and upgrade annoying and creating a lot of issue for site maintenance.
Posted By: Raoul on January 23 2010 07:28 am
@Peter
When you write "Drupal compares to other CMS as professional quality digital SLR camera compares to a pocket camera or as a gourmet kitchen and fresh ingredients compares to a microwave and frozen food." I guess you are joking or you know nothing about CMS.

One of the big issue of Drupal is that it does a bit of all, but it does nothing very well.

Remember that "the one who embraces to much is unable to kiss properly".
That's exactly what happens with Drupal. The community wants to cover everything, but nothing is done properly.

Depending on what your project is, you always can find better than Drupal.
Look at the following examples:

Regarding social CMS, Elgg CMS is way above Drupal in feature, reliability, functionnality, user friendlyness and speed.
Elgg is THE social CMS whereas Drupal only approaches some feature of it.
Here, Drupal is clearly the looser.
(Actually it is surprising that Elgg is not on this site as it is a free and opensource CMS).

Regarding e-commerce, Drupal has the Ubercart module suite.
But really, there are plenty of CMS ranging from Magento to OpenCart, Prestashop, Freeway and so on that does a much better work than Ubercart.
Already the simple OpenCart is already much better than the Drupal Ubercart module (and much faster, and fully skinable).
Ubercart e-commerce is bloated. To use it you need to install almost 31 ubercart modules + 8 other modules.
OpenCart is one installation and it works and it has more feature than what Drupal Ubercart can propose.
If you want fully featured and complex e-commerce,, then you have Magento.
Against Magento, Ubercart (Drupal) has nothing to say.
Do I need also to mention the excellent VirtueMart that goes along with Joomla?
Here, Depending on which ecommerce CMS you consider, Drupal is OK (Feeway) to looser (Magento).

Regarding freedom of design, Drupal can not compare with anybody as it has no freedom at all (or very limited one). ModX, Silverstripe, TypoLight, CMS Made Simple are already much more advanced in this regard.
This lack of freedom is also true for Drupal e-commerce modules, and any other Drupal modules.
Here, Drupal is the big looser.

Blogging? Well Drupal has blogging, but Wordpress surpasses it and so does Textpattern and Dotclear.
Here again, Drupal looses. Certainly not as strongly as for deasign, or social CMS. But several blog CMS are much better than the Drupal blog feature.

Picture gallery ? There is today no decent picture gallery for Drupal. OK, there are galleries, but poor ones.
Other CMS have built-in galleries, that are much better done.
Then you have also dedicated picture gallery CMS (Menalto, Coppermine, phpalbum, etc.) that do all much better work than any Drupal modules.
No discussion, Drupal looses again.

Feature extension. Here yes, through its numerous modules, Drupal has a lot to give. But it is not the only CMS to do so. Joomla has as much or more to give. Typo3 has many more extensions than Drupal.
Furthermore, Drupal's module developement is anarchical. Many developped modules are redondant. Often they loose their maintainers and leave the users with noother choice than to give up the feature or to develop it on their own. Pathetic, really.
Here, Drupal get a positive rating. Feature extension is one of its strength.

Site performance? EE, ModX, CMCms, Silverstripe, Typolight and many other CMS have much better caching management.
Some CMS have in core, caching per page.
Drupal is simply far from it.
If you install no module, than the performance are like OK (like the other CMS). But the more modules you install, the worse the performances become. It is a really nasty point because in Drupal you are obliged to install modules. If you do not you have no feature (no pictures, no SEO, no blog, no text editor, etc.).
Again, regarding performance Drupal is a clear looser.

So why is Drupal so popular?
Because it does a bit of all. So everytime that a new comer wants to learn about CMS, you always have somebody saying: with Drupal (or Joomla) you can do everything.

That's true, and that is also the (hidden) main weakness of this type of CMS: they do everything, but the quality of it is, at the best, only average.

So Drupal like a gourmet food? No, this is rather supermarket food: a lot and cheap. And fat. Quality is average to low. Please don't compare it to Gourmet cuisine (I'm French).

Posted By: peter on January 20 2010 10:57 am
Drupal demands a lot but it also gives a lot. It takes some time to learn The out of the box set up is somewhat limited. You will need to install your own WYSIWYG editor and image handling module as well as some other key modules like Views. Theme development requires knowledge of HTML and CSS. Some basic PHP is helpful but Drupal offers huge flexibility without needing any custom code.

The payoff is virtually unlimited flexibility. The learning curve is a function of the huge number of options the program gives you:

* Multiple content types with custom fields
* Multiple menus and taxonomies (out of box)
* Built in forum and blog features
* Create multiple user categories with fine grained access control.
* Views module is a drag and drop query building engine which can do the work of several thousand individual plugins.
* A selection of base themes like Zen and Genesis which can be extensively customized with CSS only.

Drupal compares to other CMS as professional quality digital SLR camera compares to a pocket camera or as a gourmet kitchen and fresh ingredients compares to a microwave and frozen food.
Posted By: Jean on January 20 2010 03:59 am
Nothing is black or white and definitive statements lead always to misunderstanding or unfair information.

The first point that should be obvious for everybody is that the choice of a CMS should be done according to the project you have.
Any CMS whatever it is might be fantastic for in some projects and very poor for other ones.

The second point is that the performances of a CMS depend not only of the technology itself, but also of the user skills.

A CMS can be excellent for some users and dead bad for some other ones depending on the personal skills of each user.

Therefore stating that Drupal is good or bad does not help much if you donâ??t give some additional background information along.

I will try here to give here a classification, but of course it is only based on my experience.
Although I have to say that I have tested numerous CMS (also open source CMS that are not on this site) and I am working on a daily basis with 4 of them.

Letâ??s look at this matrix:

1 - Skills:
- You are not a developer. You have some basic understanding of the internet, you put sometimes your hands in the code for hacking. But you are not able to develop a proper script.

You main concern here is to have a CMS out of the box, reliable with good community and extendable through available add-ons.
You will accept lack of flexibility (template for example), and also to spend time not only to learn the CMS, but also when you use it on a regular basis (maintenance, updates).

- You are a developer.

You are looking for flexibility; you cannot accept rigidity because you always want to bring ideas and improvements. You are eventually ready to spend time to learn the CMS, but in no case the CMS should be a burden in maintenance and updates.

Obviously, the choice of a CMS will differ greatly depending of the category in which you find yourself.


2 â?? Your project
- You will do your web site (for you or for a friend). It can be a personal site or a professional one. Main point is that it is for you own use.

Here you target is EXTENDABILITY as this project will last for you and you will want to add new features in the future. Therefore the number of available plugins is important for you.
You donâ??t need an excellent administration interface as the site is for your own use.
You adapt your project to the existing template (no customers tells you what you have to do, so you can accept the lack of flexibility).
You can also spend time in site maintenance and updates.

- You develop sites for 3dr party (customers, other) usually as paid services.

Here the main criteria that enter into consideration are TIME, COMPLETE FREEDOM in design, FLEXIBILITY, EASY AFTER SALES SERVICE, TOP ADMINISTRATION INTERFACE.
The usual main features (required by 80% of all customers) must be in the core.
But you do not need thousands of plugins:
- Because you have no time to loose in looking at all of them
- If needed you are able to develop some customized code on your own.

Nevertheless you absolutely want a CMS that gives full flexibility for templating as you will usually need to adopt your customerâ??s taste and wishes.
Top administration is also a must, as this is directly to your customerâ??s satisfaction and for you to future leeds.

Drupal clearly falls into the CMS category for user that develop their own site.
- Drupal has a lot of template where the user can choose from.
- It is solid and has a lot of plugins that allow site extension.
- Furthermore, installation is out of the box. Once installed the user need to install the plugins to be able to use it in a decent way.
Then he can start to use the CMS.
- Drupal has a strong community.
- The learning curve is steep. But as say, you are ready to give time to learn.

Drupal is not at all a CMS for user that develop for 3rd parties.
- Design flexibility is non existent. Forget to try to display your own creativity ot your customerâ??s request.
- Maintenance is time consuming: each module needs regular update.
- Update of module is a nightmare (a lot of time is spend there)
- Modules are numerous but confusing: the developer need to test many of them before getting more or less what he is looking for. It often happen that the module need to be hacked some ways.
- Worse, after a while many modules are no more maintained after a while.
- Many modules that user need to add in Drupal are part of the core in other CMS: custom fields (CKK), views, multilingual, administration, image, SEO feature, and so on.
- Documentation is plethoric but non at all organized.
- Caching is awfull and so are the site performance, especially after having installed several modules.
The DB requests grow exponentially to the number of installed modules. After installing 20+ modules (and you need to do so to have a decent site) you can already notice a drastic loss in performance.

To conclude, Drupal is a nice tool for non-developers that want to have their own site.
For developers that need a CMS as a professional tool, I would advice to look to other CMS.
Posted By: Eric Lachance on January 19 2010 11:41 am
Drupal is to CMS systems what Linux is to Operating Systems. That is, the installation of Drupal is extremely easy and clear, the messages when something is missing (permissions and requirements) are clear and simple... but when you get down to it and start trying to build anything other than static pages or "stories" (whatever those are) you are faced with a godawfully steep learning curve. It seems Drupal would require a few books and some months before I could even pretend to know what's going on and how to actually use it.

The way the plugin system is set up means you will spend hours downloading and installing dozens of pre-requisites, trying to activate them and realizing you need yet another dozen to make these work, and so on.

If you are looking for something that's simple to use and easy to understand, stay the heck away from Drupal; it's not for you!
Posted By: Titus on January 16 2010 04:23 pm
Drupal is theming is awful when compared to other CMS (e.g. Silverstripe, CMS made simple, typo light, and many other).
No design freedom at all.
There are a lot of work around to try to get something acceptable, but it is far from the level of previous mentionned CMS.

On top of that Drupal is slow. It has huge performance issues, due to its very poor caching features.

It is a CMS to play with (many add-ons and tweaks), not a CMS for real work.
Posted By: Jay August on January 13 2010 06:26 am
How can one ever say Drupal's template engine is poor? Have you even tried it? OMG, it's incredibly flexible and gives you plenty of options to render your code exactly the way you want to.

what's wrong with it? No one really comes with arguments here, so I might as well do that.

1) there are page templates. node templates, block templates, views templates, cck templates, taxonomy templates, hierarchical template selection, url based template selection, content type templates...

2) With the added module "devel", it gets even easier to select and/or code the right template for your needs, it gives you all the instructions needed to create perfect templates.

Anybody of the commenters here even used views? Or a views template? Node templates? Taxonomy templates? Probably not.
Posted By: Juanlu001 on January 10 2010 03:00 am
Maybe some of you should give a try the next version - Drupal 7 Alpha 1 will be released next week.

And maybe some of you will change your mind. I did.
Posted By: spiriralph on December 31 2009 02:26 am
Drupal is good for Blog But it is not best as wordPress
i try to run an magazin I download Lullabot.com - Advanced Theming For Drupal & Lullabot.com - Theming Basics For Drupal & so on red toms of e-books read help section of site drupal.org spend hours & days at all i find I waset my time its beter use something as Simple
very hard to set up moduls (installing missing & disabled) after you seleact to instal every thing you recive MySql server has gone on line 128 some where in a scrept
very terible after re installing every thing recive the same error amy be for Sony & othere big company is best because they have monye and many many personal to do that what I plan to do on my web server in very low capital and very chiep cast for me
Posted By: Guntero on December 23 2009 04:17 pm
I am tired to hear that Drupal is the best CMS. I would rather say Drupal is one of the most popular CMS.

BUT POPULAR DOES NOT MEAN BEST.

Sorry guys, but Drupal cannot pretend to be at the level of ModX, Expression Engine, Silverstripe, typolight, CMS made simple, etc. (all new generation CMS).

There is absolutely no control of the template. You can try to hack, you can try to learn whatever you want, it is full lost of time.

Today, many CMS allow template per page and their full control. Drupal is simply far from it.
For example Drupal still uses a bloc system for template control. This is stone age in CMS world. But Drupal does it...

Furthermore, the core of Drupal is poor. Excessively poor. You don't even have picture features, text editor, URL aliases, and so on.
But yes, you can add many, many features if you add modules.
Drupal has thousands of modules.

Fact is that many features you add through modules in Drupal are in core in many other CMS. For exmaple pictures, text editor, media, alias URL, cache, query, multilingual, etc.

The issue with Drupal modules is: the more you add modules, the more you slow down the site performance. Drupal is horrible in this respect.
I used it on proprietary server (not shared), but it is a disaster.

The worst part of it is here: you are obliged to install modules is you want a decent site, but all these module have an extremely negative impact on the site performance.
You'd rather try Joomla (even if personnally I don't like Joomla). Performances will be much better.

Other CMS (like ModX or EE) have a fine grained caching per page system that speed up your site like crazy. Drupal cache system is basic and very poor. Simply forget about a per page caching.

For me that's where the Drupal story stops: no proper design possibilities and no performance.
This is the contrary of what internet users wants: nice site and speed.

Other big issue: the numerous request to the DB.
Each module that you install increases exponentially the DB requests. On a shared server you'll be dead in no time if you have some decent traffic.

Other negatives are the extremely bad administration, the documentation that is plethoric but non organized, redondant and often outdated.
You do not have a decent user manual, but just pages and pages of hints and how tos.
Sorry, but look at Expression Engine and you will understand what I mean with good documentation.

An other point (and I will stop there despite I could write much more about it): no ressources management. In Drupal you never know where your content is located or where your files are uploaded.
Simply incredible. Imagine that you have no structure to find your files on your computer. You would feel quickly miserable.
Fact is that Drupal has no way to show your site organization.

Finally, Drupal has certainly been a good challenger of CMS like phpnuke, etc.
But it has become old and includes many drawbacks that should not be there nowadays.

Personnally my preferences go to ModX and Expression Engine because of the full control you have over your site and your content. But other CMS like Silverstripe are also excellent.
Posted By: Godip on December 22 2009 10:29 am
Drupal for noobs or not for noobs? This is a fully silly point. A CMS does work or does not. If you need 3 years to learn it, then you should go for another one.

Drupal is complicated not because it is superior to other CMS, but because it has a design issue.
The technical choices made 7 years ago are no more relevant today.
It is true that the Drupal community tries to cope with this, but that's why the technology is so complicated.

It would not be an issue, if this bloated code would not directly lead to performance problems. Drupal is very slow once you start to add modules.

Finally, Drupal is stuck with its choices made years ago, and other CMS bring today much better answer to the developper that this CMS.
Posted By: Ivan Josiah Lapis on December 21 2009 01:41 am
With my experience with drupal, it is never a noob friendly cms. Drupal is pretty much for people who has extensive experience in coding, customizing, and all other technical stuff. Deep inside drupal is strong and powerful, but, as I said, it isn't something for noobs.

If you're new in designing and creating websites, Drupal is not for you. But if you have the experience, you can use drupal to create almost any kind of website you would want it to be. And I do mean ALMOST. of course there are a few exemptions, but in the end, drupal can be formed into anything (almost).

If you need something easier, go look else where. But if you;re really good, either use drupal as base cms, or build your own.

Drupal is from the advanced to expert range of people. and I am definitely NOT one of those. But I still use drupal beacause I'm learning it. and I am satisfied as to what it can provide me with my minimal knowledge and experience. it is quite hard to maintain, yet if there's anything I would want it to do, I can make it happen. Just think that Drupal is the "wordpress" of portal cms, just without the noob friendly system. Only if drupal can improve the beginner friendly areas, then this would really ne a really really good portal cms. hands down, but as of now, I still need to look elsewhere for something at my level.
Posted By: Torens on December 20 2009 04:44 pm
Using examples like Whitehouse, FedEx, SONY BMG is a huge stupidity.
If one needs the budget of these guys to be able to run Drupal, thenI advise anybody to run away of it.

I used Drupal for several years. It has pluses and minuses.

What Robert Fabian mentions about modules is effectively a bigger issue.
Other aspects like unflexible template or poor administration are also worth to mentionned.

Despite these bigger drawbacks I use it as I considered it more advanced in some areas as for example Joomla.

But today Joomla and Drupal are outdated. They have totally missed the innovation brought by the new generation of CMS.
And really, I don't think they will be able to overcome this.


Posted By: Robert Fabian on December 13 2009 01:43 pm
I'm a more or less happy Durpal user. Used with care, Drupal can be a quick, easy, and reliable way to build interactive websites. Quick because most required functionality is available in the core as an add-in module. Easy (for users) because Drupal admits easy creation of new content types, and their viewing through attractive real-time queries. Reliable, assuming care is used in selection of modules and that you keep current with recommended releases. The end users, including user editors, see a friendly web face that "fits" how they think of the world.

An important word of caution: Limit yourself to modules that are being actively supported. And only add modules that you really need. It's just too easy to add modules that aren't really required, and that are not being actively supported. With that important restriction, Drupal does deliver on its promises.

Useful extra: Theming in Drupal is a challenge. I've found that Artisteer does a good first approximation of a desired theme. It ain't perfect and the resulting themes do need tweaking, but it's a very good way to get started. [I have no connection with the Artisteer people except as a user.]

The big challenge is continuing tech support. Drupal sites do need to be kept current with security releases. It's not rocket science, but it does go beyond what many users are equipped to undertake. My limited experience argues for a basic tech support budget of something like $100/month. And at that price there are SaaS solutions that can be considered, e.g. Wild Apricot for associations.

Bob Fabian
Posted By: Marcus on December 10 2009 01:02 pm
For us who prefer powerful to funny CMS then there is no comparison to Drupal. Today when I hire consultants, Drupal experience is a must have.
Posted By: Marcus on December 8 2009 08:05 pm
You can set up a photo gallery in less than 10 minutes in Drupal unless you are a total noob.

Becides Whitehouse there are tons of huge sites like Economist, SONY BMG, FedEx etc running on Drupal and more coming each day so it is hardly behind the curve.

It's all about taking some time to learn the system but once you do you will find Drupal the best CMS on the market, with no real competition except for very simple sites. As for security, it's good enough for Presidents and Prime Ministers. Just keep stuff updated and you are as secure as you can be.


Posted By: Gotic on December 1 2009 03:47 pm
Drupal is a piece of bloated heavy code. Administration is crap, template system is awful.
The core is very poor, it has to be said.
Hundreds of modules, yes, but you don't need most of them. And the few ones you might need, like a decent picture gallery, are low level.
A big drawback here is the lack of consistency in the module development that is not inline with the core development. This leads to security issues, lost of hacking, loss of time and big frustration for upgrading.
If you still find your way through all this, then you are still unsecured as very often developpers behind the modules just leave it there (no follow-up).
This is really a pain, and you are stuck with no other solution than to run for a paid developement.

At last, Drupal is now getting old. It needs more than a big refresher. There is a full new generation og CMS that are much more funny, usable and full of nice features.
Posted By: eric on December 1 2009 07:07 am
Well there is a comparision with Drupal, Wordpress and Joomla here http://www.cmswire.com/cms/web-cms/sxsw-web-content-management-system-showdown-update-2-004124.php

This is the result demo of the sites http://www.cmsshowdown.com/

Also for Joomla there is a multi site comparison for larger demands with Jentla addon http://www.jentla.com/software/multisite-challenge.html

About Joomla lacking multicategories cck, ACL etc there is many free addons to solve this. Just examples...http://extensions.joomla.org/extensions/access-a-security/backend-a-full-access-control/7010
http://www.jseblod-cck.com/ etc etc so It depends on what you want to do. A lot of time and money go for Drupal. Easy site for bloggin one to many - use Wordpress.
Posted By: Coryn on November 28 2009 12:01 pm
Drupal is a good blog CMS but is a real pain where design is concerned.
If you are skilled and have a lot of time then you might come to something acceptable (I still hate most of the theme done under Drupal).



Posted By: A Patriot on November 26 2009 08:32 am
Reserve posted "Drupal is used by thewhitehouse.gov for a reason! :-)" on Nov 13th ... as a good reason to use Drupal .... So how is the change and hope of the last 11 months working for you ?? .... I will be using Drupal, but for goodness sakes not because of the witness of the whitehouse !!
Posted By: TarDev on November 24 2009 04:02 pm
Drupal is not a bad CMS, but yes you can find better ones.
I did 2 sites with Drupal. It installs easily, is multilingual and can be extended by modules.
Actually installation of modules is mandatory as Drupal has very little features in core.

I would not recommend Drupal for big sites because it has very poor performance even though I used it only on dedicated servers. The many modules you need to install and the bad caching generate high volume of requests to the DB though slowing down dramatically the site performance.
Drupal is OK when considering small / medium sites.

The other bigger drawback is site design. No flexibility here and a templating system that is way behing many other CMS.

For these 2 reasons (performance and design) I can not use Drupal anymore.
Posted By: Reserve on November 13 2009 09:36 am
It stupid to call one CMS better than another, many CMS systems are good for their intended use.

If you just want a simple blog, its overkill to Durpal - Use Wordpress instead.

You don't us a bazooka to kill a fly. (A bazooka CAN however kill a fly, but you see my point)

Drupal is for larger web sites, where scalability is important!

Drupal is used by thewhitehouse.gov for a reason! :-)
Posted By: Dan on November 12 2009 10:35 am
I've been wrestling with Drupal for a couple of days now - it's a bit fiddly but I've pretty much got most things where I want them. Sure is a headache compared to the ease of Website Baker, but I wanted to find out what all the fuss was about. I hate to say this as I know it is a far superior product, but it reminds me a bit of a Phpnuke installation in that to get the functionality you need one has to rely on 3rd party modules which are sometimes buggy - like nuke it has that held together with sticky tape feel about it - but not to the same extent as phpnuke. It's all very well using a valid CSS and XHTML template, but there's usually some module or another that screws up the validity of your code. I do find Drupal templates a bit easier to work with than website baker ones though.

As other people said, there is a learning curve, not everything is intuitively placed.

I intend to persevere because I can see it has a lot of power once the niggles have been sorted out. I expect the problems I am grappling with now will mean nothing to me in a month.

Here are my biggest out of the box gripes.

Search engine doesn't search Feed Aggregator - in Website Baker it does -straight out of the box.

You also need to set up a cron job to update the feeds? (Why not not just refresh them as they are demanded if they haven't been refreshed for a while?) - Website baker just does this with out you having to think about it - it also give you options for how many feeds to show and whether to show the feed image. If you are installing Drupal on windows and want feeds, you will have to set up a scheduled task to execute wget to call your cron.php via the web. Am I missing something? Does a mature cms like drupal have to go about things in such a convoluted way?

Friendly URLs have to be configured - WB does makes them automatically without rewrite mod.

No wysiwyg editing out of the box, has to be installed and installed with a mind boggling number of configuration option. I installed FCKeditor (same as WB uses) (it has to be installed in a different way to normal modules. Now I have FCKeditor toolbar showing up, but the formatting doesn't stick so that's another problem I have to solve. Website baker includes working wysiwyg support straight out of the box.

I initially tried to build my "big site" using Joomla - and it was going great. I had a nice looking site up and running in a short time, but Zina integration was essential for me and I didn't like the was Zina integrated with Joomla which is why I switched to Drupal. Drupal handles Zina much better.

I would recommend Drupal for a big website - you can have crazy fun with Books, Taxonomy and URL aliases. It seems very scaleable.

I think for small client sites though, you would go a long way to beat Website Baker.

my drupal site is at danbensondotcodotuk
Posted By: Marco on November 11 2009 04:36 pm
I do not understand why everybody is shouting which CMS is better. You have to look to your customers ad the usability. If the customer is satisfied with the choice of CMS then you made a good choise. And the comparison of web 1.0 or web 2.0. It is the front end what you are building. If you use jquery and building twitter or other stuf in the front-end then it's also web 2.0. Your customers don't give a **** if your CMS is 1.0 or 2.0.
So it's better to look what is good for your customers instead what is good for you.
Posted By: SpreeW on November 11 2009 03:10 pm
It was good cms, but i think there is much better cms then this becouse this one has a lot of bugs. And when you got hacked no one likes :)
Posted By: Pol2XX on November 9 2009 01:56 pm
I use Drupal for several years now. It used to be a good CMS.
Like others it has some strong points and some weak ones.
Today I prefer to use other CMS that are more advanced technologically.
Posted By: Falvia on November 8 2009 06:08 pm
Drupal IS WEB 2.0!!!

What else would you use to create a modern Social Network?

ModX, SilverStripe, ??? LOL

These are CMS without any big community. If only CMS is needed, I'd use WordPress.

But building up a community needs Blogs, Groups, Forums, etc - and WEB 2.0 is a community-WEB.

It's easy to be better in filling up content for ModX, SilverStripe ore something else when all they do is creating Content-Sites without interaction to an own community.

ModX & Co are there where Drupal was years ago: in WEB 1.5!

And now Drupal (Joomla little behind, Dolphin somewhere else) is building WEB 2.0 for normal Users.

At the moment a community has reached hoto users there is enough money in sight to build up a new core. But just to getting started Drupal is the best way.
Posted By: felipe on November 7 2009 08:01 pm
drupal still amazing and i could say the best CMS framework out there... easy setup, modules, well documented, tested, etc... please dont say anything else about it unless you have really tried before...
Posted By: Big67 on November 4 2009 04:33 am
@cora

again your post does not provide any *fact* pro or cons Drupal, and this is a forum about Drupal, not about me and my attitude.

@reserve

I agree: Drupal is much more a CMS framework than a CMS. What I love of it is that it really overachieves. Everybody knows that when you work with customers you start with some requirement and then you land up changing and adding and adding requirements to the list.

With Drupal I have still to find a requirement that is not already fulfilled by some ready-to-use module. This ends up with the happy customers - happy developers perfect combination.

I just dropped the phone: a customer was calling to get personalisation of a HTML newsletter template. With drupal the answer is easy: yes in 5 minutes you will see it online.

Posted By: reserve on November 3 2009 06:23 am
you cannot simply compare Silvestripe, Modx or even Joomla with Drupal. Where these other systems are content management systems, i would not call Srupal one. Drupal is more a web application framework with CMS capabillityes. This means that it is extremly more flexible, and therefore it requires more setup.

You can compare ex. Modx with MacOS X; Most things are configurated, it works more or less out of the box. It is intuitive, looks nice, you use it straight away. It has a calendar, photoalbum, mediaplayer etc..

Drupal on the other hand is more like the GNU/Linux, you have just installed the framework. It doesent do much on its own, but when you start configurating it propably, the possibilities are endless and will complitly leive other systems in the shaddow.

Posted By: Jay August on November 3 2009 02:14 am
Sorry if I got a little defensive over this whole thing. I guess all CMS's have fans, haters and people in between. I, for one, like Drupal and I don't think it's bloated.

The core weighs in at 1MB, and you don't -really- need all that modules. I'd say 10 to 15 per site should be sufficient.

It appears Big67 and I both like Drupal for its flexibility, extensibility, huge API and hooks system, but I guess some people have a different opinion about this.

I haven't found any CMS with the same architecture as Drupal. The way its able to save every content type as node, no matter how you want it displayed is just plain genius, nothing to add to that and as I said I haven't found the amount of flexibilit in other CMS's.

If you did: good for you. I prefer Drupal for bigger projects and I seriously love WordPress for Joe Average's site.
Posted By: drupallater on November 2 2009 01:17 pm
I see a lot of hand waving from some folks about shortcomings of drupal and the cool alternatives. Please provide some details about what's better and why.
Posted By: Cora on October 30 2009 09:19 am
@Big67
Hey, if you like this old and bloated Drupal technology, just use it. What's the problem with you getting so nervous?

I used Drupal for several years, so don't tell me what's in it and what is not.
I left Drupal for one sole reason: there are much better CMS technologies around.

The World has changed and so did the CMS technologies.

There is 2 type of people: open-minded and narrow-minded.
The first ones are open to see whether the World has changed and accept to learn new things even if it cost time and energy.

Narrow-minded people refuse to look at evidences, refuse change, put there 2 hands on their eyes and keep on going claiming as loud as they can: I am right, I am right, I am right...
It is a bit what you are doing, and more generally said, it is how the Drupal community acts.

Really I do not care whether YOU prefer Drupal or not.
The point is that the potential CMS user is entitled to know the numerous drawbacks of Drupal and also that today there are much better CMS around.

Anyway, good luck with your old stuff!
Posted By: Big67 on October 28 2009 08:53 am
@lonso ""Forget these old Drupal and Joomla.
What's the need to debate whether Drupal has or has not this or that feature. Do you compare web 1.0 and web 2.0?""

Again a misinformed post without any supporting fact.

First of all you have to tell us what you mean by web 1.0 and 2.0.

If you define web 2.0 as community - user generated content driven, then Drupal is web 2.0

If you define web 2.0 as semantic web, then again Drupal is web 2.0

Ajax interfaces? Again Drupal is web 2.0

Fancy web design? again.

The "new generation of CMS" bare facts are the following:

Take ModX, I checked yesterday: current release is 1.0.1

ModX claims 17 e-commerce modules are available: dig a little bit and you find that in reality it has just 2 e-commerce modules "available" (the rest is ancillary stuff). Dig a little bit deeper and you discover that the two modules are stuck to release 0.9.6 compatibility.

So either you install the last 1.0.1 MODX or you have e-commerce feature available.

End of the line: a clear release and compatibility statement matters much more than buzzwords.

Good luck with your web 2.0 if you need to complete a project.

You can always call the customer and tell him: my new generation CMS has not the required feature, but it is sooooo web 2.0



Posted By: Lonso on October 26 2009 06:05 pm
Forget these old Drupal and Joomla.
The web has changed and so did the CMS world.

What's the need to debate whether Drupal has or has not this or that feature. Do you compare web 1.0 and web 2.0?

Drupal, despite its many modules, is in the old world. It is slow (bad performance), heavy (because of the many modules you are obliged to install to have a decent site), unflexible (template is awful), not ergonomic (it is not intuitive and user need many actions for the simplest task).

In this it does not differ from all the other old timers: Joomla, e107, Etomite, etc. There are plenty of them.

If you look for modern, powerful and fast CMS have a look to: CMS Made Simple, Silverstripe, Modx or Expression Engine.
Posted By: Anonymous on October 26 2009 07:03 am
I read a lot of "carefully misinformed" posts on this forum.

Somebody starts a post writing "Drupal is like Joomla".
This is not knowing what you are talking about.

Somebody else writes: "I would not use Drupal if you're planning on scaling to hundreds of thousands of users or more." Well, my first comment is: please thank Drupal in the first place that you reached hundred thousands Users! Second point is: I would not use ModX as well as any other PHP based CMS: a website with that huge success needs to be ported to a different stack of technologies that scale better, I would not recommend a PHP stack for sure.

Anyway if you want to see a very huge but speedy website supported by Drupal, go to drupal.org itself. It has several thousands of users, tons of pages (if you google "site:drupal.org" you get the current amount of indexed pages: 5.870.000).

These are simple facts.

Again: beware about the "carefully misinformed" posts by some people you find here.
Posted By: Big67 on October 26 2009 06:36 am
I do not see many Drupal evangelists here. Just well in the know people and misinformed people.

Preaching about the "new generation" of cms is just like that: preaching. It is rather easy to deliver performance if the only thing you do is publising some pages.

For example take a look to ModX. On the surface it delivers a very good "new" interface. Then take the time to dig a little bit. It has around 10 plug-in modules. It lacks even basic functions like e-commerce. The documentation is a bunch of pages lacking entire sections.

No e-commerce? good, then if the customer asks you for this feature... try to write your own e-commrce module for MODX... with no documentation. LOL

End of the line: this new generation of CMS has a long long long and let me say it another time... long way to become mature enough to be used in today demanding web development world.

Drupal 6 is mature and boasts thousands of ready to use modules and functionalities. Need e-commerce? Check. Need newsletter? Check. Need googlemaps? check. Need semantic web? check. Need good SEO? Check. The list goes long till the end of times.

Maybe in 3 or 4 years Modx will have the same.

Catch us if you can, dudes.
Posted By: Cora on October 19 2009 05:04 am
Drupal does not compare with the new generation of CMS. Drupal has its root in the old way of doing and therefore will never deliver excellent performance.

Yes, speed is a big issue (I tried this CMS on shared and dedicated server). Cache is a big issue, but also these endless queries do the DB that slow down the full site.

On the other hand, the more you add modules, the more the DB gets queries though impacting negatively the site speed.
Problem is, you have to add modules as Drupal core is almost empty.

It is a never ending issue that made many people to simply leave Drupal.
OK, if you have something small to build you can use it without to many damages.
But forget it for massive traffic site, or highly populated member sites.
Posted By: Michael on October 18 2009 04:26 am
Drupal is like Joomla. Both CMS had their glory time. Both CMS were at high level a few years ago.

I know them both quite well for having used them several years. But I do not use them anymore, or only if a customer insists to have them (but this happens very seldom).

I do not use them anymore because today you find much better CMS: Modx, Silverstripe, Expression Engine to name just a few.
This new generation of CMS have little to compare with the 'old CMS': Drupal, Joomla, e107, etc.
Their whole philosophy is different.

Here are a few examples:
- Excellent caching (site performance and speed). Drupal and Joomla are both slow. Drupal becomes very slow once you have added a bunch of midules.
- Easy and flexible template system (you build whatever you want) with easy and full support of web standards (XHTML, CSS and Javascript). Forget Drupal and Joomla here. You will waste a lot of time and never be satisfied with the results.
- Well tested and bug-free (not like Drupal that has always security issues, Konny is right in underlying it. Joomla is much better here.)
- Well documented: Drupal has a lot of information, but is it rather incomplete and not structured. Often it is outdated.
- Ressource (or asset) management. Drupal has never be able have one. That means you can not manage the site pictures, or any other files properly.
Almost unbelievable, but Drupal has no file management.
This is due to the fact that ALL ressources (pictures, any files) are owned by a 'node' and not by the user. It will be a hard work for Drupal to change that, and I don't believe they ever will be able to do such a change.

The big issue with Drupal is once you have installed it you have a skeleton, this means for instance:
- no pictures!!!
- no editors
- a poor administration
- no spam protection
- no SEO
- no query
- no possibity to add no fields in pages
- no pingback / trackback
- no XML sitemaps
- no file browsing
- No communication (sending e-mails, messaging, etc.)
- etc.

In Drupal you can have most of these features in adding modules.
This is a big issue very well analysed by Jean: you would need to add and activate around 80 modules to have a decent website.
Modules are rarely up-to-date and if core has moved to a new version, you are always in conflict between 'old version' modules and 'new version' modules.

Worse, module developement is community driven. Very often, the module owner stops his developement after a few years of work and leave the community without follow up. This is a big issue when you have site in production. It ends often in paying huge amount to get customized developement.

The next issue due to modules is site speed: the more you add modules in Drupal, the slower it becomes. If you build a Drupal site with decent features, site speed will be a big issue.
You can use all caching option, add cache modules, etc. Speed will always be an issue.
I use only dedicated servers. That means Drupal speed problem is not due to hardware. Really, I would not like to have Drupal installed on a shared server.

The new generation of CMS have most of above mentionned features (and much more) in core. This mean by each new release, all these feature are up-to-date: you avoid the Drupal nightmare.

Thanks to their excellent caching system, speed with the new generation of CMS is just not an issue at all.
They are lightweight, literally flying. Highly flexible, performant, of course fully featured.
Posted By: Drupal is a Bloated Mistake on October 18 2009 01:04 am
Drupal is a bloated nightmare, just asked the main developer for Popsugar.com, the most-trafficked Drupal-powered site (and one who received 15 million dollars from Sequoia Capital).

"I would not use Drupal if you're planning on scaling to hundreds of thousands of users or more. I used to work for one of the largest Drupal outfits and trust me: it abuses the database like cookie monster abuses cookies. Sugar, Inc. (neé Sugar Publishing, Inc.) was the company I used to work for. Trust me, getting Drupal to scale to that level is NOT FUN and, frankly, not worth the effort. And yes, IMO, it was more work than starting from scratch."

Jesse Farmer, former Sugar Inc. developer, on Facebook's developer forum:
http://forum.developers.facebook.com/viewtopic.php?id=162&p=1
Posted By: Anonymous on October 16 2009 01:58 pm
@Jay August
Ron is fully right in pointing out that your are insuting people. There should be no room here for comments like yours.

If people don't like Drupal that doesn't mean they are not skilled.

.pex says that "you need to do 10+ site with Drupal, then only you can say you've learned Drupal".

I never used Drupal, but if you need to do 10+ sites in order to master this CMS I will NEVER use it.

There are many glorious CMS out there that you control in little time though doing an excellent job.

Instead of ridiculous statements you should tell to people why Drupal would be of interest.
What feature is so exceptional that you can not find it elsewhere.

Te more I read the comments, the more I see that the Drupal fans have nothing special to say about their CMS.
Posted By: .pex on October 15 2009 07:37 pm
When you make 10+ websites and several different modules, then you can say I learned drupal, and then realize that the best CMS is Drupal. U can do absolutely anything with drupal without.
Posted By: cyaneo on October 15 2009 05:01 pm
I agree with you, Jay August

I used a lot of "CMS": e107, Etomite, Joomla, MDpro and phpwcms!

With all the sites where I used these different Systems I turned over to Drupal 6 2 years ago.

OK - All beginning is not easy and the learning curve with Drupal is much more higher than on the other systems (I used before). BUT: Drupal is primary a Content Management Framework where you can do mostly everything and it should be your first choice if you want do your Business seriously.
Posted By: Ron on October 14 2009 04:48 pm
@Jay August,
I am very surprised that you insult people. Do you really think you are better skilled than all of us?
Is that the way of doing of the Drupal community? Arrogant, intolerant, one is not allowed to discuss, not allowed to ask question, he is anyway an idiot and has to shut up?

But really Jay August, do you think you are the only one who understands the web? That you had the Revelation and everybody else is in the dark?

Many of us think that Drupal is a bad CMS and we explain it with documented facts (not like you). Why on hell are you insulting us?

Sorry, Drupal sucks and it is not at all due to lack of skills.

Colin as Jean are completely right in highlighting the many drawbacks of Drupal. Actually Jean's analysis is very well documented.

Personnally I stopped using Drupal (after 2 sites) not because I am short of skills, but because this CMS is fully outdated and does not answer some basic requirements a developper need to do his job.

Part of my skills are :
- Ajax : 2 years
- C/C++/Win32SDK : 6 years
- CSS : 4 years
- HTML/DHTML : 6 years
- MS-SQL : 2 years
- MySQL : 5 years
- Perl : 7 Years
- PHP : 6 years
- PostgreSQL : 4 years
- XML : 4 years
- Tomcat : 3 years

Can you tell me what additional skills one would need to be able to use Drupal? What you say is total crap.

In the past Drupal might have been a good CMS when compared to other ones. But today it is absolutely out of race.
You named 2 CMS (Modx and Silverstripe).
I use sometimes Modx and I have to say it is a beauty. Especially Modx 2.0 which is in beta now. A pure Rolls Royce when compared to Drupal. And so much faster...
Posted By: Jay August on October 12 2009 06:09 am
@Colin
Not an evangelist at all, I just read a lot about a CMS before I make my decisions here and from what I read here, about 90% of the remarks against Drupal just boils down to one simple thing:

LACK OF SKILLS.

Who dares calling Drupal a blogging tool that became a CMS? Drupal is a CMF, with a CMS built ON TOP of it.

"Regarding design, Drupal has no flexibility at all. Compare it to ModX or Silverstripe and you will see that you only loose a lot of time when you try to design Drupal."

Where is Drupal not flexible? you have regions, page templates, node templates, blocks, block templates and all can be thrown in a content template as well, if required.

do you even know you can give every aspect, every node, every block a separate template? Just by obeing the URL structure you can easily add a template for different part of contents.

But hey, keep shouting that Drupal sucks. I know one thing: so does your skill...
Posted By: Ron on October 10 2009 01:12 pm
Drupal is a huge piece of crap. It is not worth the time you spend on it. Following the advices you get here I did 2 sites for customers...

I should never have done that: I lost them as customers. If users are unhappy, it means not only hat the product is bad but also that despite all the efforts I could do it was not designed to meet their requirements properly.

Administration interface is way below average, template system is awful, documentation is not worth 2 cents, and it's such a slow CMS.

Don't use it!




Posted By: Big67 on October 2 2009 08:04 am
@ Konny

if you have never seen 14 minor releases in 20 months for other CMSs... well, maybe this is not because they are secure, maybe they do not know the security issues they have... ;)

A release every 6 weeks to me means only that the development is extremely fast and that bugs gets fixed. If you are comfortable with a CMS that has a bug release every year or so... go for it and good luck.
Posted By: Konny on September 29 2009 02:12 pm
Humm... Drupal 6.0 stable release came out in early 2008. 20 months later we are at Drupal 6.14.
14 security releases within 20 months!
What is so messy about Drupal that they cannot have a stable release that is not full of security issues? I never seen that with other CMS.

By the way 14 releases in 20 months means an upgrade every 6 weeks.
To upgrade Drupal you have to turn your site off, backup the DB, change the template to have the core template working, turn off all modules (can easily be 80 modules on a normal featured site), delete all files on the server, replace them by the new ones, re-activate all modules, change template again, launch upgrade. If everything went well, you can put your site up again.
If not (but generally it does) you have to use your backed up DB and start again.

It is not a long process. And have to do it every 6 weeks is more than time consuming. It is waste of time. Especially when you have several sites running with Drupal and located on different servers.

The issue is even bigger if you have your customers using Drupal. Unless you want to leave your customers with security issues in their release, you have to upgrade them all.
That's where the fun is over, really.

Additional messy problems is when you upgrade from a previous version (let's say from Drupal 5 to Drupal 6). Then yes you have to check whether all your modules are up to day. And Jean is right, there's where the nightmare starts as Drupal is never up to date with its modules.
Posted By: Nguyen Thuan on September 27 2009 08:10 am
Drupal is best CMS that i've seen.Tks
Posted By: big67 on September 25 2009 11:00 am
Hi there

I am using Drupal since some years (D4, D5, D6) and I am really satisfied with it.

The learning curve is somewhat steep, but overall manageable.

A fresh drupal install like the demo here is just an empty shell, and does not provide any real world functionality.
I do not think it makes sense to evaluate Drupal from this demo install.

In fact, the first concept to understand of Drupal is its modularity, that is you need to install each module-functionality you need. You have 1000s of ready to use modules, all free and open source, but you will need to select and install each one of them separately.
Often you will need to test 2 or 3 modules with overlapping functionalities.

The process is easy, just upload - activate - configure, it IS time consuming, but on the up side of this process you get a detailed understanding of each module, and, most important, the interactions of the modules with each other is CLEAR.
And you do not install anything you do NOT need.

@Jean: yes some of the things you say make some sense: there is truly the need to find a new way to develop new modules, and the modules development is community driven that is, anarchycal.

The upgrade process? But you do not NEED to do this for all the modules! If your website works, why update the modules??? Just update the core for known security issues: the core updates do not add any functionality, so you will not have any issue with the modules.

I did it some times, it is easy. Turn maintenance on. Turn modules off. Upload new core. Turn modules back on. Turn maintenance off. On a fairly complex D6 website it took 1/4 hour or so, that's it.

About your comments on templating: you are completely wrong.
It is easy to adapt and develop templates for Drupal.
There are wonderful Drupal templates.
And the new release of Artisteer lets you visually develop new templates for Drupal 6, that is you can develop a template from scratch in minutes. Artisteer is 120 bucks away.

Speed: Drupal can be fast or slow depending on the hosting. I am using a shared Linux hosting (I pay 30 Euro per year for hosting 1 website, including MySQL support) with Drupal 6 and a good amount of modules (Gmaps, Videos, HTML editor...) and it is a charm. Use caching and compress the template (javascripts css).

The clumsy administration interface: just install an admin module! I have a AJAX admin that is an ass kicker!

Posted By: Fred Riley on September 11 2009 10:48 am
I've been evaluating CMSs for a simple website I run which desperately needs to be put into a CMS to allow authors to 'own' their content without going through me as the webadmin. I also wanted built-in systems such as news and events databases, and version rollback.

Drupal does, going by the feature list on its enthusiastic website, do this and much, much more, but my major headache has been trying to exactly control the website interface. Sure, there are loads of themes available, but I don't want to use them, I want to use my own interface with its painstakingly-crafted CMS. To do this, though, I have to dissect the CSS and PHP files used, which requires an in-depth understanding of themes, which in turn requires a good understanding of how Drupal works, which requires spending serious time with the patchy documentation.

From what I can see, it's a very fine CMS which has more features than a pomegranate has pips *if* you have the time to immerse yourself in it and write extensions in CSS and PHP. You can create super-sophisticated sites fairly quickly if you use a ready-rolled theme, and its a good solution for those in a hurry and under pressure from clients. However, I want to *save* myself time but at the same time have complete control over the site CSS, and it boded ill that after 5 hours I still couldn't understand the system (and I'm an experienced web developer and CSS and PHP coder). With the amount of time I'd need to spend on Drupal to get it to bend to my will, I might as well write my own simple CMS for my colleagues.

Conclusion: the dog's bollox, but a steep learning curve which requires time and dedication.
Posted By: Colin on September 9 2009 03:58 pm
It looks like Jay August is one of these 'Drupal evangelist' claiming everywhere that Drupal CMS is good, is great, is wonderful. But never they bring any evidences.

Drupal is a CMS of medium class. Not the worst, not the best. It has a very unfriendly administration, it is slow, and has very little feature in the core.

One can add numerous features through additional modules. But yes, modules are a big issue. For example you will need to install several modules if you want pictures on your site. Not one sole module, but several. Same for music, videos, multilingual, editor, etc.
At the end one can have over 100 modules to have a decent site.
Problem is that these modules are NEVER up to date when a new version of Drupal is released.

It is true also that the more you install modules the more Drupal becomes slow. Very slow. I have never seen that with other CMS (I did 22 sites using Joomla, Wordpress, Drupal, Expression Engine and ModX).
Drupal has a poor cache system and therefore speed become a critical aspect.

Regarding design, Drupal has no flexibility at all. Compare it to ModX or Silverstripe and you will see that you only loose a lot of time when you try to design Drupal.

But as said Drupal is not the worst CMS. It has strong SEO and blog features.
Basically I would say it is a blog CMS that tried to become a website CMS. But this includes all the drawbacks of such a move.
Posted By: Jay August on September 2 2009 08:10 am
A lot of things Jean mentioned are utterly crap. You can easily upgrade Drupal modules if you know how to use CVS, its template engine is extremly flexible and I don't think their years behind on anything, except the free themes that are available are dramatically bad, to just plain evil.

Drupal is a beast, but when tamed correctly it becomes a puppy that listens to you very well. I built 5 sites in Drupal, 2 in DP5 and 3 in DP6 and I just love it. It's hard to learn, but overcoming difficulties proved to be not a big task after all.

Upgrading from 5 to 6 is indeed 100% drama, I fully agree with that, but apart from that (which is a bad thing in itself, I know) the code is clean, versatile and easy to manage.

Also the part where he claims anarchy in coded modules is not true as well. Not sure what kind of exotic modules Jean used, but the modules that will be added to core in DP7 like Views and CCK are coded excellent, with a very high standard like one would expect.

so, from a Drupal fanboy: I like Drupal. It's a wild beast, but it works and it does its tasks very good.

And Drupal slow? Get better hardware, use proper cron jobs and cache your theme. It works, and it does that out-the-box.
Posted By: Tony on August 26 2009 12:41 pm
I'm an active drupal user for many years. Drupal is a very good platform for building web application due to its flexibility(Well, I know this is only true for developer). But I recently realize that drupal is getting slower and slower. So, I'm searching for a new platform for my future application. MODx is an interesting platform. I still learning about it.
Posted By: Mad on August 26 2009 06:37 am
Jean describes the Drupal problems well. The modules you need do not work often. I personally think the drupal website is a total mess. If you need some information, its probably for an outdated version and will not work with the latest major release. If you dig into the problem you can browse through pages over pages of discussion threads, and waste a lot of time. However Drupal is not a CMS alone, its a framework for building sites. You can code certain hooks into your scripts that get executed in time, much like the Javascript events.
If it was documented decently you could do a lot of neat stuff with Drupal. But the way things are, you better invest your time into something else.
Posted By: Mark H on August 21 2009 12:25 pm
I'm a Drupal novice. Thanks for all of the comments.
Posted By: OpenSourceCMS on August 20 2009 02:37 pm
Reply to nudge:

"Hiya, this is a very silly question but this comment section that we are writing in, is exactly what I want to use on a website basically comments on topics on a news story. Is this Drupal we are writing on now or something different? I have no experience in this hence the question!"

OpenSourceCMS created this comment system ourself, but there are many open source projects that allow user comments. As one of the people who check the comments on OpenSourceCMS, I would recommend finding one with some type of "human verifier" and a way to approve/edit the comments (if needed)

Mark
OpenSourceCMS
Posted By: nudge on August 19 2009 02:02 pm
Hiya, this is a very silly question but this comment section that we are writing in, is exactly what I want to use on a website basically comments on topics on a news story. Is this Drupal we are writing on now or something different? I have no experience in this hence the question!
Posted By: Francis on August 15 2009 06:47 pm
I have used Drupal. It is very good, BUT is has yet to have PHP 5.3 support. At least do so on Drupal 6 and 7.
Posted By: Jason K. on August 12 2009 03:15 pm
Sorry guys, with Drupal you cannot set up a website in minutes... unless you do not want any pictures, proper SEO, text editors, videos, music and so on.
True, you can have all these feature in Drupal (through additional modules), but then it will take you quite a while to get there AND you will see your site slowing down like crazy.
Drupal is awful when regarding speed.

Yes, Drupal has many features. Yes, you can do website with Drupal (hopefully!). But it is not user friendly, administration is crap and the technology is... outdated. YES!

Drupal has been a the top for years. This attracted a lot of developers to it, creating a huge community.
Obviously such a big community does a lot of noise claiming that this CMS is the 'best CMS'.
You can read all over the Web how perfect Drupal is. But guys, the World change every day, and the Internet too.
What was excellent 10 years ago is more than outdated today.

New CMS have been developped integrating the best of today's web technology. Drupal simply cannot compare with them.
To name only 2 of them: have a look at MODX or Expression Engine. Both of them have stable release that already are much more powerful than Drupal.
On top of that both of them will bring a new release (in beta stage right now) that will literally blow out Drupal, even the future Drupal 7.x.

Posted By: Ludwig on August 12 2009 12:00 am
Drupal just keeps getting better. It is possible to set up and have a site running in minutes - literally - but I find that it takes a few days to get the modules and configuration to my liking. My site currently (note date of entry) represents about 20 hours of work, which includes solving a bug (which turned out to be in Firefox) and locating and installing some modules that I had not sen before. If you are serious about development Drupal is hard to ignore.
Posted By: NonCoder on July 28 2009 07:24 am
I think new users need to consider the fact that a powerful and stable core is essential, as well as a large programmer and user base, both of which Drupal 6.13 has.

It's very powerful indeed, but takes a little getting used to as it doesn't do things the idiot way. Sure, you need to install lots of little modules to add extra functions, but that a good thing because you don't hack the core. I've built a couple of sites with images, slideshows and such, and they work easily and well. I've added 21 modules, but they're small and don't slow Drupal down at all. Caching and compression options also help speed it up. Once uploaded and selected, their options make setting them up a breeze.

I think the main thing to realise with Drupal (if you're not a proficient developer already) is that it doesn't just create web pages. 'Out of the box', you can post stuff to the front page, add a forum, etc. But the best thing is that you begin by defining your content types, enter data for them, then decide how to display them. Drupal creates the displays as pages, and you tell it if you want a menu to open the page(s), and where you want the menu. Same thing for blocks and sidebar slideshows, etc. The content is all there in the background, and how you choose to display it is up to you. As for users editing the site content, that's easy too. You can provide users with their own menus, set which user roles see the menus, which kinds of content they can access, etc.

After trying just about every decent sounding CMS on this site I finally settled with Drupal. The first day I installed it I was a bit confused, but their site, documentation, and tons of great screen casts helped me become pretty expert at setting up a site in minutes. In the end you go for what seems best for you, and your experience of any CMS will differ to that of others. Personally, I recommend trying Drupal, reading the docs, and watching screen casts, most of which make you think, "Oh, so THAT's all you do!" Once you're into it, you decide what it does, not the other way around. Nothing else looks anywhere near as powerful.
Posted By: Scott on July 24 2009 07:13 am
This seems like it would be great for people who don't need it. The reality of choosing a content management system is that you will have a bunch of users who don't know jack that will be content editors. The whole point of CMS is to make it easy for them, not for people (admins) who already know how to do this. This has some neat feature ideas, but the execution is poor.
Posted By: Jean on July 13 2009 08:26 am
A few years ago, being faced with the Joomla limits I reviewed many CMS and chose Drupal.
Drupal has a clean code, very-well documented, has many features, an enormous amount of modules, a powerful community (one knows how important this is when choosing a CMS), a lot of information on the site.

But what made the decision was that Drupal is 'born' SEO. It is a delicious piece of code for search engine.
Furthermore, Drupal is known to be lightweight, a few MB only. This is only a thumb rule, but code weight has its meaning too.
A last, Drupal has some exceptional modules: Ubercart (ecommerce), Views, Taxonomy, CCK.
All these pluses did that I could accept an administration interface that is under average and the fact that you need to install many modules before one can actually have a decent working site.

I did some nice blogs and little sites with Drupal. But when I wanted to do big stuff, that i??s where the many pluses of Drupal became its worst enemies.

The code is light? Yes, but because the core has very few features. If you want a decent site, then you have to install at least 20-30 modules. Note that these modules are only standard feature in other CMS.

For example if you want full SEO one has to install following modules: metatag, pathauto, path, token, global redirect, xml sitemap and enable clean URL. 6 modules?
For Multilingual feature you need to install 8 modules? or more if you want also localization.

Many other CMS have SEO or multilingual feature integrated in core.
Then, what does it means that Drupal is light when you need to install 2, 3, 4, 5 plus modules for each feature?
Drupal is light only because most of the features included in other â??bigâ?? CMS are modules in Drupal.

You want to add a field on a post? Please, install first a bunch of modules (CCK for instance). You want to add pictures, same thing, first install some modules.

I still could accept this additional work because, as said, Drupal has some great pluses.
But it has been a mistake.

The core is a strictly followed piece of code. But this is not the case of most of the modules. Their development is anarchical and often goes nowhere.
Furthermore, often they do not respect the core standards and therefore lead to quite a few code overlap and non-coherence. This is a real issue, as you must install many modules to build a normal site.

For example if you have used the image module in Drupal 5.x and you have upgraded to Drupal 6.x (Drupal 6.x is out since late 2007), well you won'??t have a stable release for the image module under Drupal 6.x. It is still under development!
Do you think you need pictures on your site? Well, be warned.

This is not a lonely case. Many modules are still not stable today despite the fact that the new version is out since a long time.
So we read here and there that Drupal 7.x will come very soon. Many developers get nervous and would rather the 6.x release to be entirely stable (module included).

Furthermore, the module issue is exacerbated by the fact that module development is not consistent.

Take the image gallery module (this one also has no stable version for Drupal 6.x) it comes in competition with the acidfree module (another image gallery module), with the Gallery module (a bridge to Menalto), the imagefield gallery, etc.
All of them give a share of what you need, but none of them gives really all what you need.

The anarchical way of developing modules leads to a full lack of control over the code quality and the module features. More importantly, you never can be sure whether the module will be upgraded to the next release.
This shows clearly the limits of having the standard feature developed in modules.
This shows also the negative side of having â??so many modules??. Many modules only serve when developed under a coherent purpose.

The next problem starts when you have to update all your modules. A nightmare. Imagine updates that need to be done every 1-2 month or so on a multitude of modules. Horrible maintenance. Especially if you have sites installed on different servers (hosting depends often on clients).
On top of that updates are not always working properly (remember the modules do rarely follow the core standards regarding development).
In short you loose a lot of time for a lot of frustration.
On top of that, if you have done the mistake to upgrade to Drupal 6.x you inevitably faced with modules that did not move from 5.x to 6.x.

The other bad side is the more you add Modules in drupal, the slower the site becomes. It is almost mathematic. Drupal is fast when it has only a few modules installed, but it is dramatically slow when you want a normal featured site.

OK, you can always tweak and optimize here and there (and also install additional modules for caching). And out there you will find Drupal sites running at normal speed. But if one puts identical optimization efforts with another CMS he would have the impression to pilot a racing car weight ahead of what Drupal could do.
Warning: if you plan to use Drupal on a shared hosting, simply forget it.

Compared to ModX or Expression Engine, Drupal is here the big looser.
As users tend to leave site that are slow, this is a real issue.
If you plan a community site or a high traffic site, Drupal is definitively not a good choice.

Therefore I would say that the many modules of Drupal are also its biggest drawback: Drupal is nothing without many installed modules, Drupal is a nightmare when many modules are installed.

On top of SEO and speed, the other thing that is critical to developers is: template.
Here I wonâ??t be long as many other comments already point out this feature.
Drupal is definitively 10 years behind CMS like Silverstripe, Typolight, ModX, CMSmadesimple, Expression Engine, etc: no freedom, design is forced, no flexibility.

Have a look at the Drupal themes on the Drupal site: they are not nice looking and you can not propose them to a customer.
You want to use a free or even to buy one (xhtml/css)? It is wasted time and money as the template system of Drupal won'??t allow you to use it. Or you will need to spend so much time for tweaking that the bill on the customer side will skyrocket.
Look at the Drupal site and you will have an idea of what I mean with not good looking design.

Even if Drupal would decide to change its temple system, it would lead to such a lot of work that it is not foreseeable before many years.

To conclude I would say that Drupal has been a top technology when facing the well-known Mambo / Joomla, but it has missed the quantum leap initiated by other CMS.
Posted By: Robert on July 9 2009 06:36 am
Python is not very fast ?
try a google search :
python multithread
and
php multithread after...
No more comments on the speed of python.
Just look at a piece of code of each...
Posted By: Peet from Germany on July 3 2009 11:01 am
I'm looking vor a smart CMS and a small tiny Shop, because Joomla sucks with bugs. Let's see, if drupal can do it better.
Or do I have to use always the big typo3 also for small projects?
Well Drupal does not make a good show with the german translation. Last update ist a RC1 from August 2009. We have July 2009. nearly 1 year and still RC1? The informal is still for Version 5.x :-(
Posted By: Barnie on July 2 2009 05:19 am
Drupal is for people who dont use pictures on their pages, who dont want lists of articles or categories displayed on their site. Actually, people using Drupal dont need a cms at all.
Posted By: frustrated user on July 2 2009 02:39 am
Drupal is a piece of crap. It's only difficult to learn because it's a PIECE OF CRAP! Just browse through their support forum. It's full of reports of bugs and glitches of every kind that go mostly unresolved. Even the experienced users seem to have problems keeping this junk running smoothly. My site has been running only for a month and there has been THREE maintenance releases! THREE within ONE month??? And applying the upgrade is not simple process, especially if you made a bunch tweaks. Don't waste you time with this garbage. At some point, you'll probably have to dump it like I did and try something else.
Posted By: ed on June 17 2009 09:49 am
Drupal is the best and most powerful content management system out there. The People who compare joomla with Drupal dont know what they are talking about as its used by experts not web novices. Most of the issues that people are stating are not issues that I have come up against I have been building huge sites for years the great thing about Drupal is CCK and views with these modules you can build anything, sure its a lot to learn but that's why its so great.
Posted By: FJGamer on June 12 2009 08:44 pm
Drupal is my CMS of choice. I use it for my playground/personal site and two customers' sites. I have to complain about its accessibility issues and the many bugs you have to work around, but if you need a community-based CMS, Drupal is really the only good choice. Joomla is okay to accomplish things quickly, but it can't be customized nearly as much.
Posted By: Ian Hoar on May 26 2009 07:28 pm
SO many comments here complaining that Drupal doesn't do XYZ when it clearly does and you just lack the knowledge you need to do it. I've only scraped the surface of Drupal. Try reading "Using Drupal" by O'Reilly, it really does address many of the complaints posted here in the first few chapters.
Posted By: Reece on May 26 2009 04:54 pm
Joomla maybe a more solid platform upon first glance, but Drupal is infinitely more robust in terms of possibilities. Joomla is very hard to attach new custom scripts, and integrate new features with the core. Drupal offers a powerful API which can be used to easily and efficiently integrate almost anything you want into the system mainframe.

I have a lot of experience with both, and although I would recommend Joomla as a basic publishing platform, I feel Drupal is a logical choice for the more advanced developers of the net.

I have used both, and somehow always followed my heart back to Drupal. I give Joomla 10/10, but Drupal seems to have a certain pull that I cannot fight.

Excellent platform, keep it up!
Posted By: vlad on May 18 2009 08:05 am
I will stay with Joomla for now because I have experience with it. I do not see advantage of one over another.

Joomla.org is 1,130 in Google ranking
Drupal.org is 13,664

Joomla is more popular but good there are these 2 projects. Competition is good. Thanks guys.
Posted By: stranger on May 5 2009 03:17 pm
okay, drupal is faster than joomla. and also faster than zope/plone (well anything written in python isn't very fast).... but drupal can still be quite slow .... i hope the drupal team will seriously look into this instead of saying that its the SQL server problem or somebody else's problem... thank you.
Posted By: stranger on April 30 2009 12:25 pm
Drupal is powerful and well-designed. Highly flexible. Quite steep learning curve.
But the thing about Drupal that bugs me most is it can be quite slow.
Also, the insistence of the team not to go Object Oriented seems like resting on their laurels to me. In spite of a commercial spin off in Acquia, Drupal seems to be going downhill. A pity. Because Drupal is really quite good (if it could be faster).

Posted By: Michael G Parisi on April 24 2009 08:16 am
Most CMS systems sacrifice Flexibility for configurable. If you want complete Flexibility use Drupal. But don't expect it to be easily configurable. The learning curve is big, but once you know it, you can do ANYTHING with it!
Posted By: Ivan on April 24 2009 07:55 am
Drupal is the end of my CMS searching. Drupal 6 is so easy to use and so powerful. It took me a few hours to make myself familiar with the system. The extendability is great and looks lighter than Joomla.
Posted By: David Naian on April 15 2009 03:12 pm
Hi every one here. I am someone who take the effort to start with Drupal from scratch. That means no knowneldge of PHP, no Knowledge of CSS, no knowledge of JScript. Additionally I am a no native English. It toke me aproximatly 12 month to get skilled with Drupal 5.x. Drupal 6 is somehow simplyer to install but if you have no clue about PHP and modular structured systems keep your hands off. Also if you want relay on the Documentation provided on Drupal.org and are not used to communicate with coders you may get the surprise that you will be ignored. The Drupal.org Site undergo a very
difficolt time of restructuration due to the redesign plan of the Site. The registered Users are divided in coders and user class so pay attention to be very polite in your queries becasue they are almost all very stressed in the Community at this time. Still Drupal is very interesting and usefull to start over from scratch but keep always on mind that you must gain PHP knoledge if you want to have full control of the system. My best Regards.
Posted By: Mikunda on April 10 2009 01:28 pm
It's kind of hard to figure out how would Drupal be better than Joomla. It doesn't even have utilities like editors, image upload options, etc. I am a bit confused? Thanks
Posted By: Thiyagarajan Veluchamy on March 19 2009 07:08 am
Drupal is one of the Powerful Content Management System

Thanks,

Thiyagarajan Veluchamy
Posted By: tt on March 9 2009 08:13 am
Drupal is software that allows an individual or a community of users to easily publish, manage and organize a great variety of content on a website. Tens of thousands of people and organizations have used Drupal to set up scores of different kinds of web sites. Drupal is open source software licensed under the GPL, and is maintained and developed by a community of thousands of users and developers.
Posted By: Brian on March 3 2009 05:56 pm
After comparing Drupal to its major competitors (Joomla, mainly, followed by PHP Cake and Zend) I have made a faster-than-anticipated decision to invest my time and effort into using Drupal as the basis for my proprietary-coded PHP game's community.

I will add however, that when I say Drupal is 100x better than Joomla, I am speaking to PHP coders and those who can reverse-engineer bugs to keep their site running smooth. But if you don't know how to code, what the hell are you doing building your own PHP/SQL driven community anyways? Hire a programmer, our job titles pretty much sum up what we're here for.
Posted By: Regular joe on February 12 2009 08:07 am
I agree with teks. Installet today and having playet around about 3 hours and still havent managet to do anything. I dont know allmost anything about html,css,php or whatever, only the basics. This is for pro coders etc, not for the masses like wordpress.
Posted By: Vako on February 9 2009 05:00 pm
Hey Bo, you haven't looked at Drupal good enough. It can do almost anything that you need in matter of minutes. e.g.: I have a website that different clients can log-in and see only what is assigned to them. I did that in less than 2minutes!
This is only the start, once you get into the 'mood' of Drupal then everything becomes really simple, fast and powerful.
Posted By: Bo on February 9 2009 01:41 pm
Drupal was a huge dissapointment, regarding restriction to content (really non-existing or lame work-around).

Am I the only person needing a CMS where an article only is viewable to a specific group (of users) ?
Posted By: TPerkins on January 20 2009 03:45 pm
This is a great CMS.

From a developers point of view, it has the perfect amount of out of the box functionality to be considered a framework/platform. Then add on the great API documentation at api.drupal.org, and all of the books that have come out. You really can do anything.

From a designer standpoint, Drupal shines just as well. With the theme engine it has, themers can be as granular or strong as they want. For themers (with a few exceptions), the Drupal basics go along way. If you know the template systems basic behaviors and how to print a PHP variable, than your good to go.
Posted By: mae on January 17 2009 07:55 am
this is so simple, but I know it could help other..
Posted By: Manuel Mendoza on November 21 2008 06:28 pm
Drupal is the best CMS in the world.
Posted By: arun on October 14 2008 04:05 am
Drupal is the best and powerful and robust than any other CMS. With variety and loads pf modules and themes u can create a interactive website in minutes.Little knowledge over PHP and MYSQL makes u a topWebmaster.
Posted By: teks on September 19 2008 11:37 pm
Drupal is certainly not simple. It has a *tremendously* steep learning curve, and anyone that tells you that you will be up-and-running, and developing totally customised sites within a couple of months, is just not being realistic. If you are very dedicated, you can learn to setup and configure a functioning, full-featured Drupal site within that time period, for sure. That means, learning how to install and configure the core package, then learn about all the different modules out there, learn how to install and configure those, and learning how to install and configure templates (site design themes), too.

The problem is, although there are *hundreds* of modules available for Drupal, the vast majority has problems, ranging from design flaws, through bugs, to security risks, as pointed out below. Modules often conflict with one another, and with the core.

Drupal is a rather well-established (ie., old) project in the CMS community. Unfortunately, this means that the code base is also quite dated - ie., Drupal is *not* object-oriented, and although much discussion has been made in community about it, the decision-makers have decided to keep it that way.

All of this means, that while getting a Drupal site up-and-running may be trivial, truly *customising* it - ie, changing built-in functionality by developing your own modules, or even designing your own templates - is nightmarishly difficult. The abundance of expensive tomes that you can buy attest to just how 'friendly' the api is.

Finally, the Drupal community, in my experience, certainly has lots of helpful people, and people working very hard at trying to make the product better. Unfortunately, not everyone in the community is welcoming of newbies. The experience described by the poster below (complaining of unfriendliness) is a very, very common one, and I for one would certainly advise anyone from trying to get support help on Drupal irc or forums, not unless you've already read at least 'Pro Drupal Development', and put together a couple of sites.

Although I've now invested a lot of time in Drupal, ultimately I would strongly advise anyone new to the CMS scene to invest time and effort with the project. There are certainly better, and easier, tools available, with more supporting communities. I would suggest beginners look at alternatives such as the wonderful 'Website Baker', for very simple, static sites. Slightly more complex sites can be built with easier alternatives, such as Silverlight. For truly customised solutions, I would not hesitate to recommend MODx - its community is absolutely outstanding. Any of these solutions would give you a better, more polished final product - IMHO - would require less learning time, and would certainly give you a lot less stress.
Posted By: clarence on August 1 2008 09:42 pm
nice and simply cms. its work great for web designer
Posted By: Ray Dehghan on July 31 2008 02:07 pm
I repeatedly have trouble accessing the demo. It constantly says username/password not recognized.

Any comments would be appreciated.
Posted By: afewtips.com on June 27 2008 11:11 am
In the PHP world, Drupal comes with many great features. But, the biggest problem I had with it was the way it indexes the site - it needs to be indexed via a cron job, otherwise new content isn't available in search. That's a bit of a pain and shouldn't be an extra step.
Some very nice sites have been created with Drupal - to me Joomla sites all kinda look the same.
Posted By: wolfflow on June 26 2008 10:26 pm
Hi, in few words, i started in november 2007 using Drupal, with very poor Php, Css, Js, Jquery knowledge. In addition I'm no native english, so said that I got my first production site commission for 3000$ in December 07 and delivered the Portal on the 15 February 2008. So that speaks for what learning and working Drupal means to me. Thanks to all the Drupal Community !!!
Posted By: Weenerdog on June 8 2008 03:21 am
Poor poor poor, Drupal is not multi-lingual and not UTF-8. Support is horrible, you automatically get a 'it must be you' attitude back. A new 6.x version with no working mods. If you are looking for a multi-lingual script that supports it all Drupal is not it. It lacks a lot on many points and is unstable.

Forget the exploits as well, there are many in Drupal even in the new version. Your site can be taken over without you knowing it. I pointed this out on the Drupal site and got ridiculed over it.

The search functionaility on Drupal is poor as well, its incoherent and its hard for people to find information.

Overall a bloated script and a community that doesn't apreciate feedback.
Posted By: bahtiyar on June 7 2008 03:48 pm
Drupal's development team is very fast.They are already make new core.But themes and plugins development is slowly.Drupal interface is very simple and not user friendly.
Posted By: interiete.net on May 10 2008 10:49 am
I´ve tried many content management systems, but only a few systems really convinced me (e.g. joomla didn´t). I needed for my customers a multilanguage system (without the need of core hacks), which is easy to setup, extendable, has a well documented api, an active support forum and a great amount of (well coded) extensions. Besides, the system should be easy to maintain and not too complex, like joomla. 'Drupal' really does all this for me. Using CCK, views and the formbuilder you don´t need any other modules.
Posted By: Anirudh K Mahant on April 29 2008 10:54 am
Ive seen guys using all kinds of CMS probably the most famous ones like Joomla, Mambo or phpNuke etc. No offense to them, but Drupal stands out from all of them. Its so so so so so easy. Imagine putting in a block of content in something like Joomla or Mambo on to your theme. How much time and how many steps it takes to do that, but with Drupal its just, get the id of the block make a template file for the block and there you go!!!!

When it comes to CMS Drupal is De Facto
Posted By: david on April 26 2008 08:57 pm
I was banging my head against my computer when I first tried this cms but I found a good tutorial called mastering drupal. If it wasn't for this video tutorial I would have curled up in a little ball.
Posted By: Ephemeriis on March 16 2008 07:56 pm
Very, very nice platform. Very customizable. Very clean and easily understood code. Quick, flexible...what more could you ask for? Also runs very nicely on IIS.

It's rapidly becoming my stock solution for customers.
Posted By: Joh on February 16 2008 04:57 pm
Version 6.0 is out now, check out if you like!
Posted By: bahtiyar on February 16 2008 03:56 am
Drupal more simple and faster solutions for high traffics site because drupal use low cpu time and mysql connection.
Posted By: Nachenko on February 12 2008 05:53 am
Drupal can be considered 'the final solution'. It has a learning curve because it is insanely flexible, and this freedom has a price in number and consecuences in choices you take. Not recommended for low-profile, simple sites because there are much more simple, faster solutions, but if you want a system able to last for years, able to grow indefinitely and able to be adapted to most absurd changes you can imagine, this is THE CHOICE.

Also, the amount and quality of extensions and documentation make commertial system feel terribly embarrassed.
Posted By: MM on February 8 2008 09:39 am
Comment: Drupal indeed needs some learning comparing to other CMS like Joomla or Wordpress. systems. but once configured and set - you get lots of horsepower to run your site in the way you want. Highly customizable and and flexible design. Respect to guys who made this concept accessible for all and free.
Posted By: G W on February 8 2008 05:48 am
The best - Bar None. Not the Fastest or the Slickest out of the box and has a very steep learning curve; but once you get past this the power is phenomenal. Built-ins can create and organise content in any way you can think of - all backed up by core commenting, granular ACL, and taxonomy based and free tagging - and all free. The forum is powerful and better than phpBB or SMF (neither of which support basic threading); the only thing missing is an image gallery but great Gallery2 integration solves this.

Look at Drupal6 first and benchmark everything against this - you will regret your decisions in time if you do not.
Posted By: Joe Matthew on January 16 2008 06:52 am
I agree with the last comment from AainaalyaA, Drupal is simple and easy to use once you get past its internal quirks. The initial learning curve pays off quickly with ease of adding new modules easily and the large community of developers have just about any module already there.

Drupal Lover!
Posted By: crema on January 16 2008 02:41 am
I'm wondering if this cms is fast enough to use for my ongediertebestrijding website... At the moment i'm using a very simple cms, but i think the switch to a SMS like drupal is a smart choise! I'll post my experiences!
Posted By: AainaalyaA on December 3 2007 01:24 pm
Despite the fact that I've been propagating Joomla for the past 5 years plus whilst they were then Mambo, when I re-visited Drupal, and took the challenge to re-learn it, I was very surprised as to how excellent the script was written. I am now propagating Drupal to many NGOs and the one I'm attached with.

Drupal is truly the next generation of an SMS {Social Management System}. Its an excellent choice for social networks, as well as sites for grassroots activists, and NGOs.

Support is amazing - Documentation very well written, and even if one is not a techie / dev, learning scripting becomes pleasant. I've written why Drupal is the better SMS as compared to the many bloated CMS found in the market.

I seriously recommend Drupal to future site owners, as well as webdesigners looking for the most promising and most compact SMS.
Posted By: Tim Ryberg on November 14 2007 09:55 pm
Drupal is simply the best free/open source CMS product out there. It just won top honors in Packet Publishing Open Source CMS Awards this year and for good reason. There is literally nothing you can't do with this CMS once you get into it. Weather you want a blogging platform, a static site, a fully interactive community site or something in between, Drupal can do it. Many basic site configurations can be done with the core set of modules, but if that can't do what you want there is almost certainly a contrib module or modules which can do it for you. Drupal has a slightly higher learning curve compared to some other CMS's but thus far I have found nothing that compares to the sheer power and flexibility of Drupal. There are a few contrib modules I'd like to see in the core but adding the ones you want isn't arduous. The only serious deficiency that I can see is the lack of a WYSWYG editor. There are several contrib modules available to choose from but somehow none of them are completely ideal from my standpoint. Installation could be easier, but is hardly arduous. Despite this deficiency I heartily recommend Drupal.
Posted By: Gabor Vojnar on October 25 2007 07:12 am
I have been using Drupal for almost a year now. I have choosed this CMS after going over a long list of what you can do with and what you can't. The best thing that I have not found things you can not do with. Even if you work on the edge making flash sites using flex you can have a database backend with controlled by drupal. I have also tried to understand typo3 but it was too difficult and time consuming to dig into. I have also realized that Drupal have a very large community in almost every countries now. Also and not least IBM choosed Drupal as their free cms choice. After working with I have made numerous websites and things like make the site multi language is a click of a button. Im very satisfied working with Drupal.
Best regards,
Gabor Vojnar
Weboldal Készítés
Posted By: J. on August 7 2007 03:44 pm
Drupal has clean, search engine friendly URLs. Just enable clean URLs in the admin panel. Enable the Path Module (included). Also optionally install the Pathauto Module as well as the Global Redirect Module. Drupal is great for SEO.
Posted By: Tim Ryberg on July 18 2007 08:44 pm
Yes, but you need to enable it in the admin interface and rename the .htaccess file to .htaccess and possibly edit the rewrite base variable to / instead of /drupal. Not sure if you still have to do that or not. All in all a great CMS.
Posted By: DaniloX on May 31 2007 05:23 am
Hi all,

we are thinking about moving an intranet from DotNetNuke to Drupal.
Mainly for reasons of user interface/user friendliness and the hope to hence increase interactivity.

The intranet serves as discussion forum for different user groups, document storage (also for documents which are work in progress), is our online-voting environment (again for different user groups), and the contact point for members (so we want personal profiles, adress books etc.) Also, we want to be able to manage mailing lists of different user groups through the intranet. And it has to be multilingual in its navigation.

Do you have any opinions on the suitablity of drupal for such a purpose?
Do you know any comparisons of both systems (drupal and DotNetNuke?
Do you know with how many thousand users Drupal can cope with?

Looking forward to reading you,
Danilo
Posted By: Marcus on April 5 2007 02:11 pm
Hi all,

I have tried CMS Made Easy, Exponent, Joomla and Drupal for a good period of time (at least 3 months each) and have concluded that each has a place and really, it depends on your website idea...

Joomla and Drupal are the most polished and despite the reported problems with the modules lagging behind the core I personally have all the modules I need operating on the latest version so better to have modules that lag than not have them at all.

I have one site running on Exponent as at the time I found this easier for my customer to understand and they were not computer literate at all. This is a simple CMS and as such, was perfect for their site.

I run one history site myself and I tried Joomla for a long time which although I found easy to setup and skin with some HTML/CSS knowledge and virtually no PHP, in the end I settled on Drupal simply because my site isn't really a blog, but more uses the Drupal 'Book' paradigm which fit me better (I am sure Joomla can do this but it just didn't feel right).

So in summary, I would look at the top CMS systems and try them for a while to see what fits. Support is important so keep an eye on the responses in the forum and see how often the core and the modules update so that modules such as spam filters and security updates are frequently available.

I have been doing this for just over a year now so am a relative newbie but am very happy that my site has everything I need for the immediate future.

Good luck finding the right CMS for you...
Posted By: Perry Thompson on April 5 2007 12:34 pm
We tested joomla and mambo on one of our websites, however they turned out to be too complex and quite difficult to install. We then installed drupal and it is really excellent CMS and was easy to configure.
Posted By: sprocket on April 1 2007 07:49 am
Drupal has many problems mostly due to the change from 4.7 to 5.1. I have used Drupal for the past few years and version 5.1 is a major step forward especially in the organization of the admin.

Currently about 70% of user contributed modules have been updated for 5.1. however if you need a model still in 4.7 you are out of luck and must either code it yourself or stay with the old version.

Basically Drupal is falling apart. Some models like Ecommerce 5.1 are so buggy they are unusable. Other modules require second modules to work and some of these have not been updated.

I advise not using Drupal until the community gets it collective act together which I'm sure it will in time.

Chris
Posted By: Tips on March 31 2007 03:46 pm
The Drupal admin panel can be intimidating for clients if you give them full access. The best thing to do is to make an 'editor' role and only allow them to see the 'create content' link and 'edit post' tab. It simplifies things for them.
Posted By: Jatinder Thind on March 10 2007 10:04 pm
Drupal team really needs to rethink their admin panel. Currently its too intimidating for the end user. I tried implementing Drupal for a couple of clients, but they got thoroughly boggled by the admin panel.

End users are much more at ease with an admin panel like that of ModxCMS.
Posted By: beethoven on March 2 2007 07:48 am
Drupal would be nice if they will finally integrate a 'real' Forum (such as SFM or phpBB) or extend the existing 'forum'.
The existing bridges around are buggy.
Posted By: rucx on February 15 2007 08:02 pm
Drupal is the best CMS I have ever used. Come from Wordpress and was searching something with better Multilingual Integration. Drupal handles that very well! It's true that there aren't many NICE themes for Drupal, but who wants to create Out-of-the-box-websites with a real CMS? Drupal with Cache enabled is faster compared to Wordpress and Joomla. If not Drupal, maybe e107 could be another good CMS.
Posted By: glenm on February 12 2007 07:59 pm
Drupal is a bit harder for the end user but is a beauty for developers due to its cleaner and more powerful code.
Posted By: Dave on February 11 2007 03:01 am
Drupal is a very nice piece of software. I had heard that MTV UK was built with Drupal, which suddenly alerted me that here was an open source CMS capable of building enterprise level applications. And after installing and using 5.1 I wasn't disappointed. It works really as you would want an enterprise level CMS to work. A bit of a learning curve, but then that's true of custom built CMS's I've project managed in the past when releasing to clients. Of all the CMS's I tried, this is the one I'll be learning for future long term use. However, one temporary downside at the moment: many of the modules existing for the previous release (4.7) haven't yet been ported for the 5+ releases. And this is why I'm using Joomla for a current project. But as soon as all those modules are available, I'm sold!!
Posted By: okayokay on February 8 2007 01:03 am
In response to the last comment, that Drupal didn't have enough themes, go here http://drupal.org/project/Themes, there are about a 100 themes, nearly 30 themes for version 5.1 which was released only 3 weeks ago! And it's really very easy to custom theme with Drupal, a lot can be done using HTML/CSS code alone. If you are a professional, it's unlikely you'll need the free themes, usually a custom design is themed. If you are keen to use a free theme for a personal site, you can pick one available theme for version 5.x and modify it to suit your tastes. If you use the last Drupal version 4.7.x, you have an even greater choice in themes.

To the person who said he couldn't install more than one copy of Drupal on a shared server, I have had no problem in installing many copies of Drupal on different directories on my shared server. If you would like to use one Drupal installation on different sub-domains of your site (a kind of multi-domain setup), you should read the installation notes on how to set it up.

Drupal has just come out with a new version Drupal 5.x, which improves on earlier versions but since it's new, you should check whether it is supported by all the modules (plug-ins) you need.

The good thing is that there are a huge number of modules that you can pick from, take a look here drupal.org/project/Modules. If it is your first time with Drupal, be prepared to set aside some time to read about it. Though Drupal is known for its high learning curve, it really is about knowing how to code in php and some good amount of reading through the documentation to be able to extend it. It's a powerful and flexible CMS.

I would say it'll take you no more than 3 days to feel comfortable with using it, and about 10 days time to begin writing your own modules (if you can code). If you only want to hand over a ready CMS to a client in 1 day, then look elsewhere. If you can spend 5 days on something which is a sheer joy to use, try Drupal.
Posted By: Viet Nam on February 2 2007 10:26 pm
I've been trying several CMS tools (Joomla, e107, dotnetnuke, drupal) and decided to go with drupal instead. It is little bit harder to use but at the same time, it is powerfull and flexible. Anyway, the only one big negative thing about Drupal is the lack of theme. Unlike Joomla, there are less than 20 free themes (version 5.1) and normally custom drupal theme is more expensive than Joomla themes.
Posted By: Rev jeff henderson on January 30 2007 01:54 pm
Drupal was the best CMS I had ever used. I was going to set it up for a client and when I did it jacked up the original install.

Turns out, you can't install more than one copy of
this on a shared server. Like this http://www.yourserver.us/firstinstall http://www.yourserver.us/secondinstall

They say that you can install multiple drupals on the same server, but I tried and it didn't work. Had to go back to e107. Good for me.
Posted By: sprocket on January 29 2007 12:40 pm
I am doing a large project at the moment and find Drupal to be very frustrating at the moment. The reason is the lag of time that is occurring to get the plug-in mods from version 4.7 to 5.0
While I could use version 4.7, it would mean that I would have to port it over to version 5 when and if all the mods get updated.
I think Drupal mod contributors should get going and bring their code up to date, or pass it on to someone else if they no longer have interest in them.
Perhaps Drupal could impose a deadline for mod updates?
Posted By: Andrey on January 12 2007 10:27 am
There has been some updates at DrupalSites.net recently. Welcome to check and enjoy 800+ of Drupal powered sites listed! You will definitely find some examples which will convince you to use Drupal.

I'm over 5 years with Drupal and had no regrets so far. Especially now, when there are so many great developers and new modules and functionality released almost daily. I had some headaches as well of course but I would say it's a nature of OpenSource. You have to fix something yourself or wait for community answers.
Posted By: Byte on December 20 2006 12:07 pm
Read so much about Drupal and was quite impressed with the comments especially its recent award. So, I thought I got to try it out myself. It was easy to install and I really like the ease of changing templates. I managed to find my way round quite easily and like the look and feel. I then came across Clean URL and, that is where my nighmare begin. I have been on it for two weeks now and still I am getting no where with it. I posted on the forum three times and get no response. Before spending too much time on it I think I am going to abandon Drupal and try something else. Ciao..ciao..Drupal.
Posted By: kevinw on December 13 2006 06:25 am
Drupal is not Yet Another Nuke Offspring. Drupal has quite a different way to do things, which may just suit You. If you want real categorization or if You want to have better content syndication Drupal is an excellent choice. Drupal does not have the plethora of thirdparty modules that some other systems have. However - the modules Drupal has are fully integrated into the core of the system. Drupal does not yet sport a smart template engine - but the theme system is quite simple to use - even for non programmers, and after all you don't redesign your system every week. In short: What Drupal does - it does well!
Posted By: john mariga on December 4 2006 12:58 pm
I replaced my previous CMS with Drupal because I like the clean coding and the clean looks. I was not disappointed.

My problem started with the Login problem, redirecting me back to the login page. drupal forum has about less than a 200 posts on this with different solutions. My test site for Drupal 5 is also encountering the same problem?

I like Drupal but before I get deeper into it, I would rather change CMS!

Drupal 5 Beta 2 may be different!!!!
Posted By: 1galib on December 3 2006 06:59 am
Re: comment below, quoting:
'However, as with other CMS's it may be difficult or impossible to run on anything but dedicated or virtual dedicated hosts. I.e., not on inexpensive shared webhost environments.'

This is incorrect. I run Drupal on a number of shared hosts (number of sites). Works like a charm. Make sure you host with a reputable shared hosting provider. Dedicated hosting is definitely NOT a must. Drupal runs fine on a shared host.
Posted By: abhishek kumar on December 2 2006 04:36 am
I tried joomla and mambo for my website, but they were too complex also the modules were difficult to install, finally I used drupal for my website. I must claim that drupal is superb, as it supports a large number of additional modules.
Posted By: mark underwood on November 29 2006 12:47 pm
Drupal has a good function set and dedicated developer community. However, as with other CMS's it may be difficult or impossible to run on anything but dedicated or virtual dedicated hosts. I.e., not on inexpensive shared webhost environments.
Posted By: galib on November 18 2006 06:47 am
IMO, The best, most flexible CMS out there. I am impressed by its flexibility and the number of modules available. It may look a little complicated to install but once you are up and running it is truly worth the learning curve.

See it in action over my site.
Posted By: James hardy on November 16 2006 05:49 am
Drupal is fantastic, it is a great piece of coding which is both a cms and a coding framework. Tons of extensions, support and skins. Newbies may be overwhelmed by it's flexibility and wealth of features. Well worth the learning curve though. The best CMS we have tried so far.
Posted By: Dave Davis on November 14 2006 01:40 am
Drupal is our choice for our high traffic websites. Drupals caching and throttling is beyond compare.
Posted By: livbit on November 12 2006 09:45 am
Simply the most powerful open source PHP based CMS ever!
Posted By: ellen on November 6 2006 04:57 am
Very capable CMS, tried it but has a steep learning curve for web newbies so I went with Joomla which is comparable to drupal in features but much easier to work with for newbies.
Posted By: James Eglin on October 26 2006 01:29 am
This looks very promising.
Posted By: galib on October 23 2006 11:34 am
Drupal is a great CMS and I'm impressed by its flexibility and the number of modules available. At first it may seem a little confusing to install but once you are up and running it is truly a very flexible system.

See example over my site here Intelliwebtools - Webmaster tools and resources
Posted By: John on October 18 2006 04:56 am
We have used Drupal internally for several years now, and have seen solid stability and our staff appreciate the interface. Nice work!
Posted By: Western Sydney Web Design on October 9 2006 08:21 am
I have used both WordPress and Drupal for small websites for use by non-savvy business owners. Both are easy to use but Drupal is easier for you, the developer. Installation is a snap and local to remote deployment could not be easier. Drupal is like the Apple of CMS's - 'it just works!'
Posted By: Jay on September 27 2006 02:54 am
I am working on my first site on Drupal (majority of my sites are on Joomla). I would say I am impressed with Drupal, it is little difficult in beginning for newbie's but is great to work once you get hang of it. I really like their native SEF support.
Posted By: Manuel Mendoza on September 22 2006 08:44 am
Easy setup, very useful modules, great functionality.
Posted By: Hans Husman on September 18 2006 06:25 am
We built our small swedish non-profit news paper about the environment and health on Drupal:

Drupal have been very cheap, flexible and stable for us. Nothing we have wanted to do have been stopped by Drupal. And we actually had quite a lot of demands from it since we actually are combining a news paper with a reference database with fact sheets, a community and so on... So I can really recommend Drupal!
Posted By: Petar on September 16 2006 05:49 am
I like Drupal! I used it for several projects.
Posted By: Ken Lynch on September 14 2006 08:27 am
Drupal is fantastic, it is a great piece of coding which is both a cms and a coding framework. I only have two issues:

1) The documentation, while great in places is also lacking in others and it is sometimes hard to find what you need.

2) The forum community is not very helpful. I regularly ask questions regarding module development and regularly get no answer.
Posted By: newbie8 on September 14 2006 03:11 am
I am a complete newbie and I found Drupal very easy to use. I was able to put my site up (although under constant experimenting and construction) within a few hours. As for Joomla (my other site to be) I have spent days and can't seem to even get a simple google adsense function going. I have installed the adsense mambot but still can't work. Html works readily with Drupal but does not seem to work with Joomla. I do not know which cms can do more but for me, Drupal was easier to install and get running quickly...something that a newbie wants.
Posted By: Caleb on September 2 2006 07:47 am
I have a radically customized Drupal demo posted (full admin access) at http://drupaldemo.highervisibilitywebsites.com/

It includes 25+ more modules than a stock Drupal install, plus many hours of tweaking and custom themes.

Thank you and enjoy!
Posted By: Sam Castilla on September 1 2006 11:59 am
I have been patiently trying to install this software for almost a week. Finally did it today only to be stuck at the ill-advised password by e-mail nonsense for admin login. Why is everyone trying to be know-it-all Microsoft? Localhost (for local installation) may not have smtp. The developers tried to be too cute. Let us create normal admin passwords for first time log in. Ditching this for e107.
Posted By: Tips on August 31 2006 03:11 am
To the person who mentioned that it has 'some hours of learning curve' -- hours of learning curve for a great CMS is to be expected. You can hide the 'Drupalness' of a site. Look at the Drupal examples here: http://www.drupalsites.net/
Templating Drupal with PHPtemplate and CSS isnot complicated if you know HTML/CSS and can copy/paste PHP snippets.
To the person who said the MySQL performance was bad, that sounds like a problem with your server not with Drupal. You can get assistance with that on http://drupal.org forums.
Posted By: Nick R on August 29 2006 05:02 am
I tried drupal 4.7 out. The feature-set (including the wealth of 3rd party modules) was great. Where it fell down for me, was dire mysql performance, I could never find the cause of the problem (we run a few Joomla, CMS made simple, YACS! and forums on our server without problem) , so I had to move on, shame as I really liked Drupal - definitely geared up for the site developer rather than end user as far as implementing a site goes.
Posted By: Van Kham CHIEM on August 28 2006 05:03 am
Drupal is quite powerful but not the easiest package to install and use. It takes some time to go through all the options and understand well how to best use them. After some hours of learning curve, I was able to have a homepage. However, the display of the different menu part was rendered in a special way typically for any Drupal web sites. I try to fix it up but after spending too much time on it, I finally decided to switch to MODX and then Wordpress. Actually I still have only one Web site that is using MODX and MODX looks quite promising.
Posted By: nicky on August 28 2006 04:31 am
In spite of Drupal isn't easy to install and have a high learning curve, it is great, stable and powerful CMS system. Drupal have some great features like friendly URL or Threaded comments...
Posted By: Tips on August 27 2006 12:31 pm
Drupal is actually very easy to install if your server is set up correctly. If you are having trouble with it, you can get help in the forums at http://drupal.org. Like someone else mentioned, see http://www.drupalsites.net for examples of what can be done with Drupal. It's a very powerful system. I have tried many open source CMS and have settled on Drupal.
Posted By: maarie on August 25 2006 08:28 am
so what's the trick here? i want to try out drupal - i select Admin Login then enter user admin pw demo - it shows me a page with posts but i can't sem to update anything? what am i doing wrong?
Posted By: Torstein Baldursson on July 27 2006 01:08 am
Hi,
This Cms is hard to install, I can't get this one working. Moving on to something else.

Thank's
Posted By: Andrew on July 21 2006 10:06 am
You can make articles appear on the site on a particular date and be removed on another date by using the Scheduler module. 'This module adds scheduled publish/unpublish capability to Drupal. Specifically, two dropdowns are added to node forms for automatically publishing or unpublishing a node at some future date.'
Posted By: Marcella James on June 29 2006 01:02 am
You can't really make the articles automatiaclly publish (that I know if...at least I've never seen that be possible). You will just have to make it a draft and change it to published when you're ready for it to be viewed.
Posted By: Andrey on June 14 2006 05:45 am
There are some additions at drupalsites.net. Worth to check if you are not sure what Drupal can be used for!
Posted By: isulong seoph on June 12 2006 04:11 am
Drupal is great. It is very easy for people to navigate, and is extremely powerful. At first you will get some trouble but hey what's the community for? great drupal community.
Posted By: reggie on June 9 2006 02:09 am
The 'admin login' link to the drupal demo is not working?? Its taking me to the same page as the 'Front Page' link. any ideas how to get to the admin demo?
Posted By: Esther123 on June 5 2006 11:22 am
the Admin interface is a bit hard to navigate. It doesn't seem to allow simple insert image.
Posted By: djh on June 5 2006 02:04 am
Drupal may be powerful, but the learning curve is way too high for anyone thats not a coder themselves. To get the most out of the system you really have to dig in for the long haul. The community is large, but not the most user friendly. Take a look at their support forums before installing to make sure you can handle it.
Posted By: Isaac on June 2 2006 11:16 am
I love using Drupal! The community is huge and there are so many pluggin modules to use. I have Two installs running a total of 10 sites. The multi-site func is a real winner. The learning curve is a little step at first, but only because Drupal is such a powerful CMS. Once setup the site is easy to adjust. Knowing how to do it I can now set up a new install in about 15 minutes.
Posted By: Majid on May 22 2006 12:00 pm
The latest version 4.7 got a new auto table creation which make this CMS the top in list I have tried many blog and CMS like wordpress, Joomla, Mambo, Geeklog, Xoops but Drupal make feel control my website with alot of choices of powerful and most wanted modules with one click.

The important thing is to choose the right hosting company or go for virtual or dedicated server. even with shared account it's great if your hosting support drupal.

Tip: dont choose auto install of hosting company if they are use fantastic auto installation instead download latest version manullay and installed.

I highly recommend this CMS for beginner or advance user and it worh to time you spend to learn.
Posted By: Edward on May 20 2006 09:50 am
Looks pretty good to me.
Posted By: Anne Ramey on May 17 2006 09:06 am
I think setting up a default blank installation of drupal can be misleading. Drupal is an incredibly powerful tool, and is highly customizable. In one of the comments they say it's not very nice looking...there are multiple templates avaiable and it's relative simple to make your own, so it can look however you want. Another says it looks like a blog. It can look and act like a blog, or a book, or a standard corprate site, how ever you set it. It doesn't take long or much technical knowledge to set it up. Being a complete newbie to computers and sites would make it a little rough, but if you have a little basic knowledge and the time to read what your multiple options are, this is the tool for you. If you want more than a basic blog; if you want to be able to control your content and how it appears, this is the thing. Drupal is a great tool.
Posted By: tom on May 15 2006 09:34 am
i like opensourcecms
Posted By: seoreign.com on May 14 2006 02:54 am
does all the drupal.org pages uses this cms script including the forum ? I like the theme of the main page of drupal , including the font and color. nice work!
Posted By: webmaster-directory on May 9 2006 12:19 pm
Hi all, I would say this is a very creative and usefull cms..
Posted By: SlashDot on May 3 2006 11:08 am
i am thinking about using drupal to open up a BIIG history related website. Everything i need seems to be here. So i am about to give it a shot. Good work (Y)
Posted By: Sarah on April 25 2006 08:59 am
So, I'm jsut trying to get my head around this demo. I may be missing something but is there any way to actually take advantage of the taxonomy features here? Or are all of the taxonomy modules missing? I really just want to see how to get one piece of content listed in 2 or more places?
Posted By: joon on April 22 2006 02:09 am
Here's my new drupal site. I just love the flexibility. The developers don't cater to end users so it won't seem as user friendly as some other system which is fine. I'd rather have a system where the geeks do it for themselves than some other bloat which grows bigger as more people whine about needing features x, y and z.

I'm extremely pleased at how the site came out. It feels so light weight but still very powerful. It's doing xHTML strict which I wouldn't have dreamed of before and I'm not even a coder. More of a graphics guy.
Posted By: Nisha on April 22 2006 01:05 am
Dear Sir,

I am Using Drupal site for our Client site,

What is your Privacy Policy and your Term & Condition, how to handle your Script to our Client Site,

Where i am using your Portal Name, Plz Tell me more about Your Terms

Thanks
Posted By: Creasy on April 18 2006 08:39 am
easily the best cms ive seen so far.
and probably the smallest. wtf all the others are 3 or 4 mb, this is 400 kb and can do more than any other.
Posted By: iMac600 on April 16 2006 04:37 am
Had a few issues with Drupal, primarily getting the forum block on to the left sidebar.
Posted By: Dele Olawole on April 15 2006 02:05 am
I followed some of the misleading ratings here and a bit disappointed with Drupal. It looks promising but it looks everything is preconfigured and there some functions that could not get anything inserted into the database. Few fixes could make it a promising alternative to Wordpress but so far, the Wordpress I installed still rocking.
Posted By: Tim on March 28 2006 10:56 am
Looks like a good alternative to wordpress for those who want a bit more than a simple blogging platform. I'm going to download it now and give it a go.
Posted By: Andre on March 26 2006 11:49 am
Drupal is certainly the most flexible and versatile CMS available. The learning curve is a little steeper than with other CMS but well worth it, since you will be able to do things you can not do with other CMS.
Posted By: Al on March 24 2006 09:47 am
I like Drupal! I used it for several projects. I built a weblog of internet polls with it, and folks can create and vote on polls and easily send the links to friends so that groups can ask each other questions via polls.
Posted By: alpna on March 20 2006 02:58 am
Very good CMS with lots of addons available. But, this is definitely not for Newbie’s. I started with Joomla/Mambo which is very easy for newbie’s but now I am developing a site using Drupal as Joomla/mambo lack capablity for Multi-Sites and Drupal has inbuilt sef urls.
Posted By: Paul James on March 17 2006 07:43 am
I like it...

Got to check out the 'add-ons' but it looks cleaner than Wordpress, so think I may make the switch
Posted By: simon on March 11 2006 05:52 am
Drupal can be best described as a CMS toolkit. It's great for developers who understand how to extend and tweak it.
Now, don't use it for simple things (unless you are trying to learn it). For example, Drupal creates a fine blog, but if you *only* need a blog, then Wordpress. But if you need a blog+whatever+whatever, use Drupal.
Posted By: Austin Sloan on March 10 2006 04:14 am
Drupal has been a great CMS and I'm impressed by its flexibility and the number of modules available. At first it may seem a little confusing to install but all of your questions will be answered by the great people who visit drupal.org .

Since switching to Drupal I have installed Drupal for 8 other people. You can view these sites on my site under links - web design. I'm always happy to help.

I would love to see more Themes developed for Drupal.
Posted By: dvessel on March 9 2006 12:45 pm
It's funny how these CMS's are rated. I just started looking into Drupal and deserves to be way higher in the list. Drupal is more about purity of code, efficiency and flexibility. I'm sure some others can be more flexible but it comes at a higher cost. And yes, the flexibility in Drupal itself comes at a cost but it's not so bad as long as you give yourself time to figure out how it can be applied to a given site. It's not something you just pick-up and run with, Joomla & some of the others are better for that. But if your a real developer/designer you owe it to yourself to sit and read the hand books and come up with unique looking sites & solutions. It's not pretty out-of-the-box and it can look very bare.. Doesn't mean it has to stay that way.
Posted By: James on March 8 2006 07:05 am
Drupal is an excellent CMS system. Very easy to use and has great active community when you need support. Two thumbs up.
Posted By: Dragonsims on March 5 2006 11:46 am
Great work! I think i will try this on my site.
I have to check out a few more options first, but this is nice.
Regards,
Posted By: let\'s say on February 28 2006 05:58 am
let's see how this works out
tried drupal for a few weeks. I think they went a little overboard with the Categories system (although they call it something else, which adds to the confusion). I thought the Blog support it had was nice. But adding categories is a real pain.
Posted By: Michael on February 15 2006 06:43 am
I am very impressed with this software. I hope to implement it soon into some of my projects. Kudos!
Posted By: Sara on February 8 2006 12:04 pm
It was recommended that I use Drupal for my new forum over phpbb which I'm used to. I can't believe how easy it is. So far I'm really impressed with Drupal.
Posted By: l on February 6 2006 11:02 am
Wow, this is cool. ;)
Posted By: Giller on February 4 2006 02:25 am
Drupal is currently the best free CMS out there right now. Highly recomended !
Posted By: Sydney Adams on February 4 2006 01:18 am
hey ! i believe that xoops is the best CMS out there i run a few websites using this package and i find it very useful. you should also give it a try !
Posted By: Steve Parker on January 31 2006 04:53 am
I started using phpNUKE for one of my internet sites and I really liked it, although there were a million things that went wrong at the start. I had to work a lot to get it the way that I liked it; and its still not perfect today.

Before I choose phpNUKE I did try drupal and several other CMS's and I found that phpNUKE was right for that site. Later on I decided to launch another site, that was much less serious than XSreviews.

I found that drupals way of doing things was a lot less complicated and required a lot less work to get it started. It does the job that I want it to, but it would not work for XSreviews.

Depending on your needs, drupal may or may not be right for you. Give it a go.
Posted By: hallo on January 29 2006 07:47 am
I dont know if drupal ist for me?? I see just only login name and just blog. not look very nice like mambo. how can i make it look more beutiful?
Posted By: Alex Rose on January 25 2006 10:52 am
Clean and easy to use.
Posted By: James on January 17 2006 09:49 am
Drupal is great. It is very easy for people to navigate, and is extremely powerful. We built our site with it, and we're very glad that we did.

It has great community support and is highly customisable.
Posted By: Marcella James on January 17 2006 09:42 am
Drupal may not look pretty by default, but it's all up to whatever sort of theme you can cook up for it. It starts off plain but that doesn't mean you have to keep it that way. Sure it takes a bit more effort than other cms systems, but it has a lot of functionality (increased by the different modules available). If you find a bug you should report it to their forums so that it can be looked at. They are always trying to improve how it works. As for the guy using php5, various modules would also have to be upgraded to run under that. My host has php5 installed if I wished to use it (which I don't). I'd rather have stuff that works reliably instead of something that looks like it works and actually FAILS when I need it.

I don't know what modules that last guy was using but if the module doesn't say it has been upgraded for that version of drupal it might not work. I recently encountered such a problem when I needed to convert my movable type posts and I still haven't been able to accomplish it. Nothing is perfect (don't we all wish everythign could be).
Posted By: BClark on January 16 2006 10:21 am
i looked at drupal originally, but found that it didnt have SEO friendly urls and full css implementation for seperation of style and content.
Posted By: walterbyrd on January 16 2006 02:51 am
Buggy as hell. Although drupal 4.6.5 is advertised as being able to work with PHP5, in reality, it won't. Drupal has many modules, which seem great, until you actually try to use them. For example, drupal's module to import-export content is completely broken, and apparently has been for some time. Not the nicest looking CMS either.
Posted By: auto on January 15 2006 06:34 am
Drupal is a very clean CMS. It's module, core, and theming system is very robust. The admin section is a lot easier to navigate than mambo. In mambo I would have to click a dozen things, and navigate back and forth between multiple sections to get one thing done. In drupal, the admin section works the way it should, and is friends with common sense. Also it is pretty easy to get drupal working with multiple sites, ie more than one domain name sharing the same drupal install. This lets me have a couple different sites and domains with one hosting account. The url of each page can also be written in a clean way instead of with ugly variables. Drupal has fairly active support forums and IRC channels. It could be better with regards to many posts with no replies though. I searched first, honestly! The development and bug fixes are also very active. The only thing lacking is the amount of quality themes, but it is really not that hard to convert existing themes, such as a mambo theme. Basically insert drupal's php variable snippets in the right place and play with the styles. The next version will supposedly help break away with the forced 2 or 3 column layout, letting you put sidebar boxes where ever you want. I look forward to this!
Posted By: Richard on January 14 2006 10:20 am
We've compared several CMSes using this website(thanks opensourcecms!) and narrowed it down to Mambo, Joomla, and Drupal. Though the default look wasn't really too inspiring, the core functionality was really, really well thought out and the module system really just makes our lives easier! No need to worry about how anything about the core works, just modify/extend the module you're after! The number of files that we had to modify is less than 5!
Posted By: Artem on January 13 2006 08:19 am
We chose Drupal as our to-move-to platform -- it suits best for writing collaborative work (such as technical climbing or mountaineering reports), as well as publishing finished content. Taxonomy module is a excellent solution for naturally categorized content (in our niche: geography, grades, participants). Drupal supports i18n -- a must for exUSSR Europe.

(Some big modules may be a problem if your hosting provider prohibits customizing PHP memory limit)
Posted By: anto on January 12 2006 03:22 am
Dear administrator,
in my office use drupal editor, but we can get problem to reset administer (unclick), may I can get your info to help me? so we please help me...
thank you
anto-santana
Posted By: Loloy D on January 11 2006 03:09 am
Hubris without basis is a fallen giant. I like using Drupal very much because it's direct to the point, light-weight and REALLY ROBUST. It's not a walk in the park to get it started though.
Posted By: Petar on January 6 2006 04:32 am
Drupal seems quite good to me. I like drupal's Search engine friendly URL.Drupal is one of the best CMS's out there.
Posted By: Al Zheng on December 30 2005 12:04 pm
Drupal is the best CMS system I have ever used. It's easy to configure.
Posted By: David on December 30 2005 07:43 am
Not the easiest learning curve, but flexible and powerful. A number of useful features incorporated into 4.7.
Posted By: Derrick on December 30 2005 01:56 am
These tips are very use full for us. Thanks.
Posted By: One Man on December 28 2005 07:15 am
Drupal works fine with me ...
Posted By: Test on December 28 2005 07:13 am
Someone has replaced login page with some static page. Can not test further..

thanks.
Posted By: Tarik Hoshan on December 28 2005 07:02 am
Very good CMS. Experienced some installation errors that I think are due to adopting the latest version of MySQL. The internationalization is extremely easy to use and update. Lots of plugins. Will soon upload drupal to my web site.
Posted By: david on December 25 2005 05:54 am
on par with phpnuke no question about it
Posted By: Nicky on December 24 2005 06:40 am
Did not realise that The Onion runs Drupal, that’s a great testament
Posted By: Giller on December 22 2005 09:54 am
The best CMS out there. Easy to use and install and very flexible. Loads of add ons and support.
Posted By: Peter on December 22 2005 09:45 am
Drupal is not very user-friendly I think it sucks.
Many errors after install wich is a real though job to do.
Thanks but no thanks useless to me.
Posted By: Bernz on December 21 2005 05:47 am
Considering the popularity of Drupal and rating I'll have to give this a shot to redesign the mobile spa site.
Posted By: Gail on December 19 2005 06:09 am
I tried a few CMS scripts, but found drupal to be the best. Two thumbs up
Posted By: Carlo on December 15 2005 07:30 am
I am a newbie with Drupal, but it looks like very powerful and flexible. Only a problem, it is a bit too difficult, you must get confidence with his structure.
Posted By: Milton on December 15 2005 06:44 am
Hello! Drupal seems interesting...
Posted By: yuumei on December 8 2005 10:09 am
I have used a few CMS scripts, but drupal is the best, i wish i had seen it before the others >.
Posted By: Joseph Mikulas on December 6 2005 04:30 am
Hi,
I am running CMS Drupal on some servers but customers complain that admin side is too difficult to manage. Then after migration to Joomla! they are happy with the Joomla! administration side.
Posted By: Tobi on December 5 2005 07:09 am
It�s for me the best CMS ever! Very, very flexible - german users can also look on:
Posted By: Florian Radut on December 5 2005 02:50 am
To show blocks all over the page just use a Drupal module called
Posted By: AjnabiZ on December 5 2005 01:12 am
@ Florian Radut

If you can show me how to show blocks in the center, then ill believe you.

You just cannot come here and say that those people who say that nothing can be done with the center. Prove it. Its a CMS, we should be able to do it easily thats the whole point.
I know that it can be done by hacking the core, but whats the use. Its not that powerful afterall.

Most of the drupal websites resemble Blogs with the exception of some. And they say that they have custom made the templates.


But i have found
Posted By: peterthevicar on December 4 2005 12:54 pm
Easy to install, easy to get started. It's a new way of looking at content - organised by category rather than in strict hierarchies. Very powerful with lots of modules just waiting to be enabled to add even more power. The Drupal website is an Alladdin's cave of modules and code snippets. It takes a while to get going but I can't see there's anything you can't do. The event and taxonomy_menu modules are really good to have. Enjoy!
Posted By: Florian Radut on December 4 2005 01:43 am
With this CMS you can do everything. It is stable, very well written and you can use a lot of add-on modules to create the website of your dreams. Many people here are saying that there are only left and right columns or that it is impossible to do something special with the center. This is wrong! Others are saying that it is difficult to learn or to complex to administer. If a top racing car is too expensive and difficult to drive then try a bicycle... but Drupal is free and is the best.
Posted By: Tester on December 3 2005 03:09 am
What makes Drupal superior to other CMS? Is the module system worth the effort. How long may the comments be?
Posted By: J on December 2 2005 12:31 pm
Actually, Drupal does support modules and some of them are very nice. There's not much additional configuration that you need to do unless you need a database. Just drag them in and you have the functionality.

It is correct that the stable release of Drupal does NOT support center blocks! You can only place a block on the left or the right, which is ridiculous. I can only hope they are addressing this in the new version, because this one guffaw is a show stopper for many people. I mean...WHY?

If you Drupal developers are checking this site, I really hope that you fix this glaring problem. I'd like to see it as a patch for 4.6, rather than in a new version where all of the older modules will not work.
Posted By: Andrey on November 30 2005 08:35 am
There are a lot of buzz for what Drupal can or can not do. But it really depends on how deep you want to go. In my opinion Drupal is truly open to any additions or modification.

Check our new Drupal showcase and directory site! You may be amazed!
Posted By: RealTech on November 29 2005 08:20 am
One of the most boring and simplistic interfaces I have ever seen - how can Drupal be called
Posted By: ibn on November 28 2005 06:49 am
Actually Drupal lacks a lot.

its not modular and it only supports left or right column module placement.

YOu cannot do anytthing in the center column.
Posted By: Raqueeb Hassan on November 24 2005 12:23 pm
Drupal works fine with me .... switched from Mambo to Drupal ... last month.
Posted By: peter on November 22 2005 01:35 am
Ok, pretty good.
Posted By: Rob on November 15 2005 09:50 am
I found Drupal while searching for a CMS with which to build a user-driven writing/book review/literary site (bookmuncher.com, to be launched soon). Drupal's already impressive out-of-the-box capabilities are enhanced by a plethora of user-contributed modules. Yes, there is a bit of a learning curve, but even a beginner like me was able to get a basic installation up and running quickly. After playing with the various features for a short time, I have torn down my experiment site and am about to launch for real.
Posted By: Flasher on November 7 2005 02:04 am
I tried Mambo and it's too simple for me. Now I switched to Drupal to start my new project and surely find it more powerfull and clever than any CMS I used (Mambo, Limbo, Geeklog). If you need something really configurable, try Drupal !!!
Posted By: AJ on November 2 2005 04:52 am
Drupal may take a little longer to learn but it is worth the effort. I've switched from Mambo to Drupal a few months ago and have found it to be a powewrful CMS with all of the features I need.
Posted By: tyler on October 28 2005 06:45 am
I'm still developing my site with Drupal, although it's already public, and have found it to be a great CMS. It is powerful, flexible, and robust. It really does include just about everything you need, either in the base install or downloadable modules. I only wish it allowed easier phpBB integration.
Posted By: shoelace on October 12 2005 08:00 am
I evaluated many of the CMS apps listed on this site and while Drupal may not have been the flashiest amoung them, it by far was the most complete as far as the features I was searching for (News, Blog, Gallery, etc.)

The big point for me was that Drupal has a blog as part of the application. None of the others had this and could only be added via third party mods. I also spent a lot of time reading through support forums on all the CMS apps that I evaluated. hands down, the support forms for Drupal were the best.

If you are someone that is not strong in php and CSS development; someone that wants a nice web site with solid features; someone who wants good support... Then Drupal is for you!!

As mentioned they may not have the nice 3d flashy themes like some of the other CMS apps, but overall, it beats them with ease of use, built in functionality to meet the current demands of users, and a great support system!!
Posted By: JLee on October 3 2005 10:01 am
I haven't found another product that compares to Drupal. Ideal for people not expert at php, sql etc who just want a scaleable "engine" to build that community/members site. Fully scaleable with a lot of optional add-ons and modules. Vibrant community and support. only minor area for improvement is the documentation which is undergoing improvement in dec 2004/jan 2005.
Posted By: Andrew on September 30 2005 11:50 am
I have used opensourcecms as a tool for comparing different packages and trying them out. I finally decided on Drupal because of the clean design and good feedback. I opted for the pre-selected set of modules provided by Civicspace, so as to save me time, and this proved to be a good choice.
Posted By: PpP on September 29 2005 02:14 am
The most intereting feature is Taxonomy, a rare many-to-many structure for categorization. Overall, do most what others do and should be more than enough for a personal site, and sufficient for organization.
Posted By: james notry on September 26 2005 12:09 pm
I didn't realise at first there is NO LINKS page. but the modules make it really easy to update your site. Very nice content editor as well. Overall, Drupal is very good as a first CMS.
Posted By: James Czar on September 24 2005 07:13 am
I've tried so many CMSs it makes my head spin. Finally, with Drupal, I've found one that is fairly straightforward, yet complex enough that it is very capable and can adaptable.
Posted By: Flavio Veloso on September 22 2005 02:28 am
Just for clarification, you don't need to use taxonomy (that's "categories" on Drupal language) anyway to use Drupal. In fact, it's a separate module (plugin), so you can even uninstall it if you prefer (though there's no need to do it -- just turn it off). For instance, I have about half-dozen Drupal sites and use the taxonomy system in only one. The taxonomy looks difficult at first, but when you get used to it, you see it gives you complete control of how to organize things. You soon see that it's... just perfect.
Posted By: AJ on September 20 2005 12:01 pm
I have been using Mambo or the past year and decided I wanted a more robust, feature filled CMS. Mambo was great but Drupal is even better. Mambo is definately easier to setup in the beginning but once you learn Drupal then you see where the differences are. Drupal is much easier to manage and has a lot for functionality than Mambo. I am also receiving a great deal more hits using Drupal thean I did with Mambo.
Posted By: worldnick on September 14 2005 09:07 am
Pros : Built in forum, good user permissions, and reliable
Cons: Administration area is inside the site which makes it very difficult to tell what you're doing to the big picture. The administration area should be taken outside the main site. Also the content system has something called a book page which seems like an odd and confusing thing to put in a general CMS. There is no links module, rather hard code links on to templates. This is odd.

Drupal is like this really well coded beautiful CMS that someone made to fit some specific goal they had in mind. If you use drupal you will have a drupal site. Other CMS's like Mambo and the Nukes are more versatile, but less tight.
Posted By: derrick on September 13 2005 12:40 pm
The cms modules makes the process of updating the websites very easily. Only few website designing companies offers customised CMS systems for websites developed by those website designing companies.
Posted By: Jakob Buchgraber on September 2 2005 09:43 am
It looks like a real good cms and I like the different themes. But most of all I like the content-editor, because it's just a simple 'textarea' field and no WYSIWYG-Editor like Tiny MCE or FCKEDITOR. On the one hand this makes creating content for absolute beginners a little bit harder, but on the other hand it's much easier to create validating xhtml code. I'm not likely to user any other cm system any more.
Posted By: Daniel Poon on September 2 2005 02:24 am
I am trying to find a good CMS, and I think I found what I need here! Thx for this great web site sharing the best of CMS info. Drupal is certainly my pick after 4.6 is released. I'd like to know more how security is handled for more controlled environment.
Posted By: Mike on August 21 2005 01:20 am
Probably not the best choice for beginners, but this script works great for people who like to really dig into the script and make it blend perfectly with the rest of the site.
I have a friend that uses it with great success (although several times his custom scripting would bring his sight down for hours XD)
Posted By: Melanie on August 15 2005 08:22 am
This is a very nice CMS which I've already used in two different projects. Its strength: a wonderful solution for Language translation and it's very easy to set up your own registration form with individual fields. Very nice. Excellent documentation. Just fine-tuning of access privileges is sometimes difficult and needs coding. The biggest drawback: Visibility of blocks (or panels, however it is called) can't be controlled. Anyway, I will stick with it!
Posted By: Alexander Hempel on August 2 2005 05:27 am
Yep, that's it. After two weeks of swearching and testing nearly a dozen different systems, this is my CMS. It is primarily aimed at community/portal sites, but with a little tweaking that took me about half an hour it is perfect for a personal website. It allows you to remove all the register/login stuff for normal users. The vast amount of add-on modules adds flexibility, there are modules for nearly everything. Support and documentation are shiny too. Perfect choice for me.
Posted By: Nick on August 1 2005 11:44 am
Drupal is an OK CMS if you just wan't to pick a theme and begin working on your site. Its also very good for a cummunity site, like an open source blog. However textpattern is also a very good CMS that has more customizability than any thing i have ever seen or used.
Posted By: Tony Wright on July 30 2005 07:44 am
Drupal is fabulous-- but the default install is definately just a framework-- it's the collection of modules that really makes it shine.
Posted By: Andrew Cohill on July 29 2005 08:36 am
The newest release of Drupal (4.6.x) contains many small changes that have greatly improved usability, especially in the area of administration, which was not always entirely straightforward in past versions. The Drupal developers pay close attention to the user community, and the 4.6 release shows that they listen carefully. The new calendar, although a bit harder to set up, has many new features, including multi-day events, day, week, and month views, and filtering by category (really makes the calendar easy to use).
Posted By: Jonathan on July 23 2005 06:08 am
This is one of the most capable systems available, superb for community sites, easy to extend, and highly configurable. It is not the solution for all sites but Drupal works well for many.

It is slightly different than many CMS solutions, in it's rather fluid configuration. Once learned, it's very easy to extend. It's simple PHP programming (it really is relatively simple) uses only functions and no classes or methods, which makes it very, very simple for someone with only a relatively small amount of PHP knowledge to modify and extend.

The user community is superb. It scales well. Professional support is also available, so this is a system businesses might look at.

I highly reccomend it.
Posted By: yoba on July 23 2005 02:43 am
A really good CMS,of course.
Posted By: Rene Moroa on July 20 2005 03:12 am
Drupal is great! I can recommend it! BTW Does anybody know if the Elixon CMS is Open Source/Free?
Posted By: CK on July 19 2005 02:28 am
I installed it and has everything it needs to make a specific members only site. I have one site on Mambo, one on two on Subdreamer etc, but the one thing that make me choose drupal is that fact that I can find all the modules I need. Yes mambo is the same way, but mambo was harder for me to get specific items done and presented in a certain way. Overall I like it. One of the best free ones out there. Yes it does have drawbacks, but don't they all?
Posted By: Karolis Tamutis on July 18 2005 06:44 am
A really great content management system.
Posted By: Dror on July 17 2005 07:30 am
The best in its field, not only a CMS can be used for many other things.
Posted By: bdude on July 16 2005 12:11 pm
great cms, used it on many previous sites, highly recommended.
Posted By: Edgard Durand on July 15 2005 04:09 am
Cleanness of drupal code, well implemented development proccess, and on time security fixes, makes this CMS a good choice. After the experience with my first drupal site, I'm now creating a whole network of them.
Posted By: beiter on July 14 2005 11:55 am
The very best for communitys and very, very good as CMS!
Posted By: michael on July 13 2005 12:18 pm
nice for community sites buy not as CMS
Posted By: Neum on July 13 2005 10:44 am
I'm very impressed with Drupal so far. We are in the process of switching some of our sites over to it. Very nice work.
Posted By: Natri on July 7 2005 12:47 pm
I worked on almost all the Content Management Systems in the world before Drupal. After that I never look and work on any CMS in the world.
Posted By: Lolak on June 22 2005 11:38 am
Good cms, clean, flexible and many modules available!
Posted By: bevau on June 18 2005 12:55 pm
Best CMS ever! Very clean and flexible!
Posted By: taspac on June 15 2005 08:47 am
Drupal is an excellent product with excellent support
Posted By: János on June 15 2005 07:12 am
The generated website-s code seems a bit weird... Well, let's just say, not for human processing. I couldn't get the translation module working, either... I guess, I'll just write my own. At least, I'll know, how THAT works. :)
Posted By: Andrey on June 4 2005 04:03 am
I use it for 3 years. Just perfect! Siple, clean and highly configurable.
Posted By: Vinay Yadav on June 2 2005 04:54 am
Very nicely coded system. Easy to install and manage things. Adding new is also very easy in this system.

A verty good system.
Posted By: TCat on June 1 2005 08:11 am
Drupal is the best for developers. This source code is very very clever!
Posted By: aaron on May 30 2005 11:27 am
This CMS has great features, as well as, lags in some areas. The templating system isn't great as mentioned, but the flexibility makes up for it. If your not needing something that you can totally redesign, but needing something that will be a pleasure to post in everyday, this just might be your CMS portal.
Posted By: johnnybe on May 30 2005 05:45 am
There is no install script, you have to manually load the .mysql in to your database, very un-handy.
Posted By: Emiliano on May 27 2005 11:49 am
Drupal is the best CMS I know! I tried many others and Drupal is by far the easiest and more flexible of them! It's very easy to customize it and install new modules. Its community is very friendly and always helps us! Believe me, Drupal is the best!!!
Posted By: Petr on May 19 2005 02:50 am
I tested Drupal, but I dont understand the system of user autorization. If I don't want user login and disable it.. I then cannot login to admin area.. strange.
Posted By: bento on May 18 2005 08:40 am
The best OS Community and Blog CMS!
Posted By: Logan on May 17 2005 01:11 am
This system is incredibly extensible, flexible, and easy to run out of the box. However, if you want to customize the theme or tweak Drupal's functionality a little, you are going to end up neck-deep in code.
Posted By: eka on May 16 2005 12:05 pm
Simply the best, clean, easy and powerful

did a great job on our site
Posted By: Lupin on May 16 2005 11:59 am
Now with Migration script you can migrate your Nuke databse to Drupal. For infos http://www.drupal.it/project/migration
Posted By: Tim Sanders on May 15 2005 01:56 am
Date 15.May.2005

Drupal is clean, ergonomic and modular. It is not perfect yet, but Drupal is capable to become perfect,
if you and me participate in the large Drupal-Comunity.

Drupal is your choice if your website has more than 50 pages and not more than 1000 categorys.

Large amount of files, images (1000000) is not manageable yet, but is possible with Drupal.

Drupal has excellent in:
User-Management, arrangement for text-content, search (not for all languages), customization capabilitys, implementation capabilitys, internationalisation capabilitys and surely more.

I have tested all major PHP-CMS-systems and would prefer Drupal over Mambo, eZ Publish, Typo3, e107, all Nukes and pure blog systems.

eZ Publish is still better than Drupal and you should test it in comparison to Drupal. eZ Publish is not bad, it is just overloaded for me.

If you have root access to your server you should test, try, prefer Midgard-CMS, Twiki and Plone.
Posted By: syaman on May 4 2005 11:27 am
Although it has a steeper learning curve than something like Mambo. it is Incredibly more powerful and versatile. All it needs is a larger collection of free templates to get the newbie started..
Posted By: Alex Smith on May 4 2005 10:39 am
I love Drupal! My site (TuxTalk) runs it, and it is a doddle to set up. It's features are amazing, and it is SO simple
Posted By: Aaron on April 21 2005 05:05 am
I'm using Drupal 4.6 at this site and really like it. The new version seems flexible and there's plenty of plugins available.
Posted By: Achean on April 18 2005 07:58 am
Set up on all this is really not all that complicated. Just set up 4.6 on a windows box (Urrrghh!) with Apache2, PHP5 and Postgresql8 in half an hour flat. In short, as long as you know a bit about administering PHP, and can set up a schema (using PgAdminIII, in this case) the install is a bit of a doddle. Of course, on a remote Unix box with nothing more than a command line it might take a bit longer, but isn't rocket science.

All I have to do now is play about with it a bit.
Posted By: Jack on April 17 2005 12:14 pm
I like drupal's Search engine friendly URL.
Posted By: Stuart on April 16 2005 08:10 am
Drupal seems quite good to me. I was suprised at how much one of the below posters, SMSenn, seems to think Drupal is
Posted By: Jason on April 14 2005 04:41 am
The negative comments here amaze me. Drupal's install was easy if you can follow simple instructions, and nobody has mentioned that it has some of the best community features around - notably, everyone can blog and those are all readable, but the community determines what makes the front page. It's beautiful.
Posted By: Jeff on April 9 2005 11:53 am
Drupal is great. It's easy for people to navigate, and is extremely powerful. We built our site with it, and we're very glad that we did. We custom-built a video module for it, and it makes our workflow much more straightforward.
Posted By: danny_8 on April 8 2005 11:43 am
Fantastico botched the installation of this CMS on my hosted server, but I quickly located the answer in their forum. You can use the
Posted By: danny_8 on April 8 2005 08:29 am
Fantastico botched...(continued) ...but I recovered easily enough. Best looking CMS I've used. Font-resizing trick (ctrl-wheel) works with Drupal, most other CMS do not. I think I'll be going with this one.
Posted By: Marino on April 3 2005 04:40 am
I don't mind if installation is a bit hard, I can handle it. But I need to install it and pass it to users who know no HTML, nothing. From the demo I don't see the following.
WYISWG data entry.
Image upload resizing for articles and stories.
Posted By: Nick on March 27 2005 11:47 am
Druapl is one of the best content management systems I've ever used. The installation wasn't bad and the configuration flexability is great. It also has a huge number of modules to really let me customize what I want to do with it. Not only do I use it, but I reccomend it to all of my friends. I've been running a blog for about 5 years and switched to this a few months ago. I love it.

As a developer, this system is great!
Posted By: M. Mayberry on March 22 2005 10:32 am
Drupal is one of the best CMS's out there. It has a simple, clean interface that enhances functionality. Its extreme versatility and excellent documentation are major advantages over some other CMS systems. The base system doesn't quite do what I need, but having full documentation makes it much easier for me to implement my own modules. Have used it on my home network with great success and am implementing it at work.
Posted By: toddnks on March 15 2005 03:44 am
Tried Drupal for about 10 days, never could get it to work, and it appeared that it was a drupal error (drupal's site has a several running discussions about mysql 4+) Gave up, downloaded xoops, and was up and running that night. What a difference.
Posted By: SMSenn on March 13 2005 08:33 am
Holy Crap do not believe the comments about Drupal. It's a piece of crap. The functionality barely is usable. If you change the wrong admin sections you have to reload your database. The modules rarely work correctly. Unless your willing to spend a great amount of time debugging the PHP code stay away from this one. I tried for four days to customize this software and once I got one section worked out it messed up another section.
Posted By: Andrew Cohill on February 14 2005 09:54 am
Drupal is an excellent product with excellent support. There is both a mailing list and active discussion forms for problems. As with any package, some users won't take the time to read installation instructions or spend a little time learning to use the system.

I have used Drupal as the basis for a single blog, for a private small group workspace, and as the basis for a community information network. The newest version (4.5) is much easier to administer.

Drupal's
Posted By: Barnie on February 13 2005 03:37 am
Strange system for a special community only. Subcategories dont show up. Uploaded files (images) and links to pages remain hidden. Confusing authorization scheme with ridiculous roles and permissions should make the admin feel important. At the end the admin's access is being shut off by himself. That is a piece of junk done by people who just finished the php course.
Posted By: Roy on February 12 2005 12:19 pm
It *looks* great, BUT why do you want to switch off php SAFE mode? You don't! If you switch it back on after install (which fell over a number of times and needed manual tweaking), it breaks!
Safe mode is there for a reason! You don't want some scriptkiddy hacking into your machine through php... Switching Safe mode of is only advisable in an intranet situation for testing and debugging ONLY!
Posted By: Matt on January 30 2005 01:59 am
Installation is appauling. Manually importing MySQL tables. The CMS itself is great, but really how much would it take to write an installer script?

Unacceptable for such a mature CMS.
Posted By: R A Murphy on January 27 2005 12:50 pm
I've been trying to find a flexible, easy-to-use CMS and website development platform for the past couple of years. Don't know how I missed Drupal but I'm sure glad I found it.
It's so easy to theme, to add or pare away functionality, to enter/edit content, to build menus... I can't say enough good things about this product.
I'm in the process of switching nearly all of my sites to Drupal, even though they serve different purposes. Drupal is good enough to handle everything from brochure-ware to full blown communities. It's the only CMS I know of that is this simple for a designer yet includes so many features, including a shopping cart.
I've tried and/or am replacing Postnuke, MDPro, ezPublish, eNvolution, Xoops, Mambo, phpWebSite, and Xaraya.
Plus it's TINY! I don't know how the developers did it but they deserve a big thank you!
R A Murphy
Posted By: Rob on January 24 2005 01:22 am
I've used Drupal for some time and I love it. However, it requires a lot of customizing and you're probably better off using Mambo if you need a lot of help.

The biggest problem with Drupal is that the developers don't work to make it compatible with any other systems, preferring, instead, to create everything within Drupal. While they do a truly awesome job, it's asking too much of them to create a single standalone CMS that can do everything possible by itself.

The bottom-line is that I use Drupal when I need a flexible and high-traffic website, but I'll normally use others for personal websites, because they are easier to use for specific tasks.
Posted By: Mike on January 23 2005 05:04 am
I have tried them all it seems and I think I may finally settle on Drupal for my personal site. I have been looking for something between a blog and a portal, Drupal seems to be clean, well balanced, efficient, and highly scaleable. No installation script is included as of v4.5.2 but its fairly easy to setup. I like it.
Posted By: Edgard Durand on January 17 2005 01:45 am
After trying several Content Management Systems I have finally chosen Drupal for my website, it has lots of features like forums, blog, etc.
Posted By: gsuez on January 14 2005 08:51 am
their installation is difficult for beginners... it is not very friendly
Posted By: Ryan Walker on January 5 2005 11:33 am
I take it all back (see comment below). Drupal is now much more designer-friendly, thanks to phptemplate and drupaldocs.org.
Posted By: Ryan Walker on November 16 2004 12:57 pm
As a designer, I still feel encumbered by Drupal after messing with it for 15+ hours. By now I'd like to feel like I can control the design of my site, but I'm still in legend-of-zelda mode, pushing various boulders aside to try to reveal the hidden secrets of this software. Some users on their forums swear you need not feel encumbered as a designer with this software, but I'm not there as of yet. I still feel like I'm being asked to administer my way to a site design. Meanwhile: The feature set is nice and the permissions/roles system is great. Code is stable. Pages are pretty fast.
Posted By: anthony on November 15 2004 05:50 am
shockingly easy to setup and extremely versatile. in debian don't forget to install the php4-mysql package.
Posted By: Jenecai on November 11 2004 10:55 am
I was amazed with drupal. I've used and helped develop a few CMS's, but after going through the sourcecode for drupal and the inserted modules, i was very pleased and also impressed at the code. it was a simple process to install, and once i was in it just kept growing. it might be difficult to theme if you don't know css. fair warning.
Posted By: GW Bush on November 1 2004 02:40 am
Drupal is really nice. I was able to create a new site without any major problems. There are rumors on the Internets that drupal is going to take over the world. Go Drupal!
Posted By: Andrew Cohill on October 28 2004 11:59 am
Drupal is an excellent content management system that is easy to install and easy to use. I use it on a half dozen sites, and it just works.

The 4.5 release has significant new features, and the administration interface is substantially improved. It has always been easy, but the improvements make it much easier for new Drupal users to administer it with less fuss.

The Category system is Drupal's real strength, and I have no idea why Jason calls adding categories
Posted By: Jason on October 10 2004 10:59 am
I tried drupal for a few weeks. I think they went a little overboard with the Categories system (although they call it something else, which adds to the confusion). I thought the Blog support it had was nice. But adding categories is a real pain.
Posted By: Gilbert on August 27 2004 11:46 am
Very Usefull
Posted By: sitch on July 3 2004 09:43 am
Nice. Good for blogging. Simple.
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